Green Week 2019: The Carrot Awards

April 17, 2019
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Ayers Saint Gross hosts an internal Green Week every year to advance sustainability literacy within our staff so we can provide better high-performance designs to our clients, reflect on our sustainability achievements to date, and plan for the year ahead.

Over the course of next week, we’re sharing information we’ve learned through project (or projects’) certifications, professional certifications, and conference attendance, as well as bringing in invited guests. We’re pleased to host Dr. Christine Sheppard of the American Bird Conservancy who will be speaking to our entire firm about Bird-Friendly Building Design. Anne Greenstone from Steelcase will be teaching our Baltimore office about the Fitwel certification and office wellness, and a representative from CMTA will teach our DC office more about design considerations for net-zero buildings.

Since 2011, we have annually reported the predicted energy use intensity of our whole building projects and the lighting power density of our interiors projects using the AIA 2030 Commitment. This data allows us to recognize and reward the most energy efficient of these projects from the previous calendar year with our annual Carrot Awards to inspire other projects to strive for greater energy efficiency.

We believe sustainable design and great design are the same. Our highest performing projects under design in 2018 illustrate strategies every project in our firm aspires to achieve.

We’re pleased to announce this year’s Carrot Award winners are the Hayden Library Reinvention at Arizona State University and the Brown Advisory Bond Street Office Third Floor Tenant Improvements. Congratulations to the design teams of these projects!

Hayden Library, originally built in 1966, is representative of a design and construction era that was limited by available technology and prioritized considerations for a library differently than today’s campus conditions require. The HVAC, lighting, plumbing, and architectural upgrades included as part of the library’s reinvention result in a significantly more resource-efficient building than the existing construction. The project is predicted to have an energy demand of 55% less than baseline and will offset a portion of its electricity load with a rooftop photovoltaic array. This work would not be possible without the collaboration of an engaged client and our team at Affiliated Engineers.

The Brown Advisory Headquarters Tenant Improvements provides commercial office space in Baltimore for a privately owned investment management company. The space we designed for them reduces lighting power density by 56%, more than twice the current AIA 2030 reduction target for interior spaces, through daylighting and LED lighting.

Be on the lookout for more sustainability-focused projects from our firm. For more on how Ayers Saint Gross approaches sustainable design, see our firm’s sustainability strategy, Take Action.

Ayers Saint Gross at SCUP Mid-Atlantic 2019

March 19, 2019
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The SCUP Mid-Atlantic Conference is March 20 – 22 at the University of Maryland, College Park. As a council member, I’m excited to be attending and hope you will join us. With the conference being so close to our DC and Baltimore offices, Ayers Saint Gross will have great representation, and I am looking forward to seeing many old friends and making new ones! Keep your eye out for Sally Chinnis, Alyson Goff, Adam Gross, Jordan Hawes, and Eric Zahn.

Thursday, March 21 is a big day for the firm, as we have two exciting concurrent sessions and a tour of the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center.

Student Engagement Leads to Thriving Residence Hall
This session will examine the successful process behind planning Trippe Hall, a residence hall at Penn State Behrend. The design process incorporated student input at various stages, from schematic design to furniture selection. Attracting prospective students means providing spaces where they want to cultivate their education and community. You will discover new ways to foster student engagement throughout your building design process, resulting in spaces that are ideal for today’s students.

Learning Outcomes
1. Involve students early in developing the program for your next campus building.
2. Create forums, panels, and surveys to collect end-user data that will inform the programming and design of your new building.
3. Create a student learning experience out of your new building project by giving them ownership over design ideas and allowing them to work through real-life plans and BIM models themselves.
4. Collect occupancy feedback from students after the building has opened; distribute surveys to students and then share your findings.

Presenters
Karen Kreger, Senior Director, Housing and Food Services, Commonwealth Campuses Pennsylvania State University
Michael Lindner, Director of Housing and Food Services,
Penn State Behrend
Jordan Hawes, Interior Designer, Ayers Saint Gross
Eric Zahn, Architect, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
8:30 AM – 9:30 AM
The Hotel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Calvert D

 

Measuring Classroom Performance: Design Process and Lessons Learned at University of Maryland
This session will explore how TERP (Teach, Engage, Respond, Participate) classrooms perform at the University of Maryland (UMD) Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center. You will learn how evidence-based design research supports budget, design, and utilization of active learning classrooms (ALC) by reviewing the ROI of TERP classroom performance, utilization, and learning outcomes assessment through student surveys. You will also establish criteria to measure ALC effectiveness and justify why increasing square footage and utilization accommodates collaborative learning in diverse disciplinary uses over the classroom’s lifecycle.

Learning Outcomes
1. Describe design attributes and performance criteria to be considered when designing formal and informal collaborative learning environments.
2. Summarize how to measure the impact that collaborative learning environments have on student learning outcomes.
3. Argue why collaborative learning environments are worth the additional funding and space.
4. Implement methods to collect student and faculty feedback in order to evaluate collaborative learning environment effectiveness.

Presenters
Elizabeth Beise, Professor, University of Maryland College Park
Alice Donlan, Director of Research, University of Maryland College Park
Adam Gross, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Kristen Ambrose, Principal, Director of Research and Development, Ratio (Former Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross)

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
The Hotel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Calvert C

 

Tour: Active Learning at the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center
The presentation and tour of the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center at the University of Maryland, College Park will be conducted with a brief presentation of planning, programming, and design concepts for the 187,400 gross square feet LEED Gold academic building. The tour will highlight innovations in active learning classroom design for large enrollment undergraduate courses.

Learning Outcomes
1. Review space guidelines for a teaching and learning center and understand the limitations of regulated state guidelines and standards that influence the design of active learning classrooms.
2. Prioritize space attributes and performance criteria to be considered when designing an active learning environment and describe the process of collecting precedent research and analyzing relevant examples.
3. Identify design criteria for learning environment design that considers universal design principles for diverse pedagogical approaches and access resources to produce a furniture mock-up of a proposed design condition that meets universal accessibility and ADA requirements.
4. Implement methods to collect student and faculty feedback and develop survey questions to create a post-occupancy evaluation survey for occupants to evaluate the effectiveness of learning spaces.

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Built to Last: Creating Comprehensive Interior Designs

February 13, 2017
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As a firm with more than a century’s worth of history, Ayers Saint Gross understands that design must stand the test of time. Working mostly with large institutional clients, we create enduring interior designs from a thoughtful pursuit of functional, beautiful, and durable selections. We balance our established knowledge of the tried and true with an eye towards the industry’s innovations and improvements to produce the best possible results. Here’s how we do it.

1. Developing good relationships with vendors who can work at scale. The Interiors team at Ayers Saint Gross has deep knowledge of quality products and is in contact with the industry’s best representatives. We take the vetting of our vendors seriously. It’s not unlike a job interview. Can your product meet or exceed the benchmarks of our and our clients’ standards of design?

In addition to a product’s performance, aesthetics, and contents, we also assess the principles of the manufacturers and expertise of their representatives. They are among the experts we consult to verify industry standards and to advocate for best design measures. This working relationship helps develop our acumen in materials before we propose solutions to our clients.

In the event of complications during or after installation, our vendors will be proactive in assisting our projects with attainable resolutions. We have to have confidence in them, so our clients can have confidence in us.

2. Building and maintaining a materials library. Even with a lot of electronic options for browsing products, Ayers Saint Gross maintains material libraries in our offices. We’re curious here, and we like to research and investigate. We compare, and we shop for quality.

Besides the ease of having samples on hand, our libraries are interactive ‘sketchbooks’ for materials. Collections continuously evolve, and they literally display our enthusiasm to study and innovate. Since many of our clients have facilities departments with their own materials libraries, we appreciate opportunities to collaborate on current preferences and valuable lessons learned that design standards documents might not provide. Information sharing is a two-way street, too; often clients use our product knowledge and libraries as resources in developing their own collections.

Industry experts also know the importance of our libraries and visit regularly to update holdings and canvass needs. In addition to keeping our libraries current, this contact strengthens Ayers Saint Gross’ voice (among other national design firms) to ensure our clients’ goals are represented as manufacturers improve and develop products. (We are excited about plans to make the libraries easier to navigate and access remotely. Stay tuned!)

3. Finding quality materials and using them correctly. Even quality materials can fail if they are misunderstood or installed poorly. The range of materials with which we work and the significance of the materials we select has never been greater. Our clients’ interests in interior design are many, including: demonstrating an investment in their communities, supporting branding and marketing campaigns, and streamlining maintenance practices. As a result, interior design is constantly changing where options, adaptability, and maintainability are among the indicators of quality work.

Our deep experience in higher education, designing residence halls, libraries, and other high-use buildings, has taught us the importance of longevity and durability. Materials are viewed and touched throughout an occupant’s day, placing our selections front and center for continuous evaluation and assessment of a project’s overall quality.

Clients have long memories, and may retain a bias against certain materials, colors, or designs based on past experiences. Often a material alone does not fail; rather, a non-standard application or low quality installation caused problems. The Interiors team at Ayers Saint Gross investigates materials and their applications to weigh the pros and cons. Our design process includes a systems-based approach to assess a material’s compatibility with other material selections, and evaluate its constructability in combination with other materials.

4. Listening to clients. The pop culture idea of an interior designer is usually someone who sweeps into a meeting with a pre-existing vision. This is pretty much the opposite of how Ayers Saint Gross approaches interiors.

Our design process begins with client-specific research and questions followed by very close listening to what our clients say. If we’re creating a common area in a residence hall, should it be energetic and bright? Or do the students need a more subdued space for relaxation and recharging? Once we understand a client’s goals and hopes, we can use our knowledge of a project’s context, architecture, and cost-modeling to evaluate and advise, envision and create, and transform spaces into places.

We host collaborative moments for our clients to contribute and respond to schematic ideas that help inform the next steps. This nurtures a creative partnership that distinguishes a project as client-specific vs. trend-specific only. Eventually, a fully formed design emerges from team vision. Clients notice when they see their comments realized in a completed project and our work to discuss and listen proves to be a wise investment in (and by) Ayers Saint Gross. This shared effort sparks enthusiasm in the success and endurance of our service and projects.