Forward-Looking Space Metrics

July 16, 2020
Share

As colleges and universities think through back-to-campus scenarios and their path forward as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it is important to consider just what metrics inform the space analytics that are foundational to understanding a campus.

We have asked experts from across our firm to share their thoughts on:

  • Learning Environments
  • Student Housing
  • Higher Education Workplace Environments
  • Schools of Nursing

Q: What factors should be considered when developing forward-looking space metrics?

Three major trends have driven instructional space metrics over the past decade as higher education has shifted toward student-centered learning.

Autonomy: Information is now instant and mobile. Now that content can be acquired fast, free, and digitally, the new purpose of the classroom experience is to explore knowledge. This type of learning environment requires an increase of net assignable square foot per student. An instructional space that meets these guidelines will provide greater agility in adjusting to 6-foot social distance requirements, as well. Flexible furniture also allows institutions to rearrange or de-densify rooms.

Experience: The customization of the educational experience has led students to prioritize experience and hands-on learning. This type of learning often occurs in class laboratories, open laboratories, maker spaces, and research labs. Laboratory environments are rich with learning experiences that cannot easily be duplicated via online courses even prior to COVID-19, and we often recommended that institutions increase the amount of laboratory and maker space on campus.

Porosity: If you strip away the curriculum and the credits, a campus exists for serendipitous encounters between students and scholars where creativity happens, ideas are explored, and learning experiences are created. Porous learning environments allow learning to take place inside and outside the classroom and at multiple scales and comfort levels to create an equitable and adaptable learning environment for all learners. Post-COVID, experiential campus experiences may allow universities to differentiate themselves and offer an alternative to online lecture-based learning. Universities should consider dedicated space for student-centered study, group learning, and gathering space to represent approximately 15-20% of the instructional space found on campus.

Q: How is this affecting students?

Physical distancing in the classroom limits an instructor’s ability to “reach and teach” every student. By distancing students in the classroom and limiting instructor/student and peer-to-peer interactions, the learning environment favors students closest to the instructor. In this situation, a virtual synchronous environment may offer a better learning environment. In the virtual environment, the distribution of students on each screen is random, students appear the same size, and multiple modes of interaction are available via microphones, chat features, and interactive whiteboard exercises. Moreover, asynchronous virtual opportunities give students the flexibility to learn on their schedule. Learning does not compete with other priorities, such as jobs or families. Students can watch material multiple times to take notes and absorb information.

Q: Are there any fundamental differences for student housing during the pandemic?

Schools are exploring how to move forward, and it’s easy to imagine certain scenarios: relying more on single units, including converting traditional doubles to singles, for instance. Many schools, however, have planned and built in swing space for special accommodations that develop during the academic year. The pandemic adds another layer to this complexity and highlights the need for a flexible framework from which to work.

Many colleges and universities plan to start the fall semester at full occupancy, while leaving a certain number of beds or residence halls vacant as COVID-bed surge space. Other institutions are relying on the off-campus market to relieve pressure on their housing stock to best align their bed capacity with social distancing goals. Regardless, many are considering significant operational, policy, and infrastructure measures, such as reducing the occupancy capacity of their residence hall common spaces, more restrictive visitation privileges, providing much more frequent cleaning, or putting locks on common bathrooms to limit the number of students sharing each one.

As students return to living on-campus, schools will have a plan in place in case there are resurgences. Institutions with medical schools and requisite facilities may opt to provide their own testing and care, while others are partnering with their local medical community. While hopefully anything of that nature is only momentary, these measures may need to be in place for some time. When it comes to what makes a successful residence hall, though, the recipe remains the same: community leads to better student outcomes, so it remains crucial to provide the proper balance of outside-the-unit space and manage them responsibly in these trying times.



Q: Beyond physical distancing guidelines, how do we create workplace environments for the campus community that promote a sense of safety, inclusion, and collaboration for both in-person and remote participants?

On average 25% of a campus’ non-residential space inventory is devoted to office space and are part of most buildings’ programs. Small changes to office space metrics can have widespread impact, so it is critical that decision-making be grounded in data. An analysis of the anticipated needs of the workforce and the past utilization of existing space is a good starting point. Employee data and room-by-room space inventories can provide great insight and help identify opportunities to build a program that provides appropriate space per person for individual work, storage, circulation, and collaboration.

Also, consider how remote work, social distancing, and staggered or flexible schedules may impact space needs. Campuses should still be sprinkled with spaces that foster collaboration—both informal, spontaneous encounters, and more formally scheduled meetings. They should, however, anticipate increased virtual participation, both from those working remotely and those on-campus not ready for face-to-face interaction. Technology should be ubiquitous, and capacities and furniture layouts should be reviewed to ensure adequate space per person and good camera sightlines.

Q : What could this mean for offices moving forward?

Faculty-student interaction, which is critical for student success, will require a different setting. Looking forward, I anticipate increased demand for spaces that can safely accommodate one-on-one or small group interactions. In-office meetings already have made some uncomfortable and will likely now make many feel unsafe. I recommend identifying underutilized spaces in academic buildings (ideally in highly visible areas frequented by students) and repurposing them as dedicated, reservable faculty-student spaces.

Q: How are the skills lab and simulation spaces for nursing being altered by COVID-19?

Many schools have taken a detailed look at how to effectively prioritize and use specialized spaces safely while keeping the importance of a rigorous education front and center. After March 2020, nursing programs lost their clinical placements, and as a supplement to clinical practicum, nurse educators shifted to virtual and screen-based simulation through a variety of resourceful methods to supply all of their students remaining clinical learning hours. Immersive simulation using VR and projection is one way to transform any space into a simulation environment offering more utility from existing spaces and facilitating endless simulation scenarios.

For in-person lab courses in Fall 2020, nursing programs must calculate the useable area of their labs, less fixed equipment such as hospital beds and exam tables, to determine the reduced space allowance per student. Students can continue to work within their clinical groups that are normally 8-10 people, except they are spread out into different spaces. Flexibility and adaptability have long been key to designing success health science education spaces, and the COVID-19 pandemic is highlighting this importance.    

Q: What kind of methods are being implemented?

Some things are now common in the broader world–smaller groups, temperature monitoring, face masks, daily sanitization of space and equipment—but there are some creative new ideas and methods. Skills and health assessment can be supplemented with customized lab packs sent to students to use at home. The expense of the lab kit can be offset with invention—one schools is discussing 3D printing their own objects and anatomical models for students to use at home. Some programs deferred skills training from spring to fall in hopes to have more hands-on opportunities. Virtually, students have been able to demonstrate skills competency through Zoom break out rooms, after viewing instructor demonstrations. Objective structured clinical examinations, key measures of a student’s competency, can be reimagined virtually as telehealth appointments with simulated patients. Telehealth has seen expanded use during the pandemic, so this has an additional benefit to train students in the way in which they may be working. Overall, some of the new teaching methodologies were found to be more successful than originally thought, and will continue in the fall semester.

Q: What about Nursing, Multidisciplinary Research, and Public Health?

Community based research in nursing has evolved since the onset of COVID-19. Here are some examples of how Duke University School of Nursing is providing outreach and creating partnerships with social work and public health organizations during this pandemic.

  • Homelessness: With the same goal to improve community health, partnerships such as the DCHIPP (Duke Community Health Improvement Partnership Program) is connecting the school of nursing and the community. Students transitioned from their traditional clinical setting of screening patients to working with the Durham Homeless Care Transitions (DHCT) organization that offers temporary housing, a case manager, and access to rapid testing for those who are homeless.
  • Spanish Speaking Populations: Multidisciplinary teams lead by the school of nursing have been established to work with the county health department to inform public service announcements by developing culturally and linguistically appropriate educational materials to the Spanish speaking population.
  • Aging Populations: To assist seniors and the geriatric population, the school of nursing research team is facilitating virtual teaching sessions on effective communication with seniors so that volunteers can effectively communicate and provide reassurance during telephone encounters with seniors.
  • Global Healthcare Initiatives: With global clinical placement trips cancelled, nursing students partnered with Cureamericas contacting hundreds of Guatemalan residents and speaking to them informally about COVID. They are developing a database, referring them to local resources and creating an evaluation plan.

All of these efforts showcase really important work and the power of research and multidisciplinary teams.

ASU Hayden Library: Reinvention
of a Mid-Century Icon

May 20, 2020
Share

The Arizona State University Hayden Library Reinvention, located in the heart of the main campus in Tempe, AZ, opened in Spring 2020. Originally built in 1966 to serve a population of 20,000 students, Hayden Library had grown to become the anchor institution for one of the largest public universities in the country. Its system consists of nine libraries, serving more than 70,000 on-campus students and encompassing over 5 million volumes.

This extensive renovation reimagines and reinvents Hayden Library for the 21st century. The main drivers for the university were to provide variety of flexible spaces for learning, studying, collaborating, and making; enhance campus connectivity by engaging with the surrounding malls that intersect at a primary campus hub and a newly activated ground floor; and employ a sustainable approach to all aspects of design. The 252,600 GSF interior and exterior renovation transformed a place for books into a place for people, reflecting the diversity, history, sustainable vision, and scholarship of the university and greater Arizona.

Mid-Century Renovation

The original 1966 Weaver and Drover design of Hayden Library allowed for access and approach from the adjacent malls. Later additions, over several decades, removed ground-level entry to the tower. The 2020 Reinvention harkens back to the original design by celebrating the details of the past and highlighting them throughout the project. The mid-century modern shell and unique details, such as wood balustrade with stainless steel inlay on the existing terrazzo central stairs, are all maintained. The ground level is opened to allow for an approachable and welcoming experience for users, and custom profiles and angular geometry found throughout are reinterpreted and repeated in a mix of old and new details that support modern codes while maintaining the sophistication of the past era. A new interconnected vertical stair provides the network link from structured learning on the lower level to informal study and discovery of the upper levels.

21st Century Library Program

Part of a larger system with changing needs, the Hayden Library Reinvention embodies the library’s vision of a hub for inquiry, collaboration, innovation, and encounter by enriching the experience of patrons and supporting a broad range of uses. Traditionally enclosed programs break out and open into each other, blending use and ownership, and creating opportunities for cross-pollination. The design provides for a variety of flexible space types for learning, studying, collaborating, and making. The third level of the tower is dedicated to innovation, bringing together a collection of research centers and interdisciplinary learning labs that take the ASU community beyond book collections and archival materials into other regions of today’s scholarly landscape, in which new platforms for research and data facilitate new means of knowledge creation and dissemination. Collaborative lounges are dispersed throughout the floors to provide more student space and encourage quiet conversation. The fourth level reading room is designed for open reading and collections space. The perimeter is lined with modular shelving with integrated seating and display.

Campus Connections

With no clear entry, the existing tower was disconnected from the adjacent buildings and campus malls. Moreover, the subterranean entrance through the adjacent building addition created wayfinding issues. The new exterior design infills a majority of the surrounding moat on the lower level, creating a ground level plaza to reconnect the tower to campus. The 2020 Reinvention reinforces campus connections at building entries and new canopies mark ground level entries, connecting students from the campus malls to the library. The new entries improve wayfinding and extend campus green spaces and plazas into the heart of the library. The ground level plaza engages the surrounding campus malls, connects library program at ground level to adjacent buildings, and eliminates barriers to entry. Reading Rooms featuring unique, curated collections for active use by students and faculty are arranged along the long west side of the tower, showcasing the reinterpreted library program.

Retain and Renew

A design challenge for the Hayden Library Reinvention was how to reimagine the existing library in place to minimize environmental impact while giving Hayden Library the contemporary amenities it requires to support students. Reinventing the library in lieu of tearing it down allows 95% of the most carbon-intensive elements of the existing construction, the structural system and the opaque portions of the building envelope, to remain in place. Material choices throughout the project’s finish palette encourage the use of products that are regionally available with recycled content. Upgraded glazing and HVAC systems bring the best of contemporary high-performance building practices to the project and energy modeling indicates the new library will reduce energy expenses 47% compared to the existing library. Inside the building, water conservation is supported by efficient plumbing fixtures that are anticipated to decrease potable water use by over 37%. Outside the building, native plantings and a high-efficiency irrigation system reduce potable water consumption by 80%. The project is currently tracking LEED Platinum certification.

Hayden Library’s reuse retains the embodied energy and value of its structure and reveals the character of the building in a new light for a new time. Reinvention allows for a design respectful of context, history, and tradition, while showcasing new and future uses and programs, built around a mix of details that celebrate the past and project the future. By creating welcoming, equitable environments, engaging surrounding malls, and reinforcing physical and visual connections on the site and within the building, the library repositions itself to support students at the heart of campus, reconnecting itself to its place.

Green Week 2020: The Carrot Awards

April 23, 2020
Share

Since 2013, Ayers Saint Gross has hosted an annual Green Week to elevate sustainability literacy within our staff, advance high-performance designs for our clients, reflect on sustainability achievements, and plan for the year ahead. Our firm continues to energetically advance the diverse interests of our clients and communities. It feels particularly important to celebrate Green Week this year, the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

The global scientific community agrees that preserving our way of life requires keeping global warming below 2°C. Past 2°C, climate change will accelerate and become irreversible – the planet will warm until humans can no longer survive. The scientific community has established a carbon budget of 500 GtCO2e. This is the total amount of carbon human activities can emit from this day forward and stay below 2°C. Annual CO2 emissions today are approximately 40 GtCO2 per year. If we maintain the status quo on annual carbon emissions, in about 12 years global warming will accelerate. The time to act is now and as practitioners in the built environment, we play a critical role.

The AEC industry’s discussion of sustainability has historically focused on operational carbon emissions from building operations. Keeping buildings at appropriate temperature and humidity, electric lighting, and powering our plug-in devices are responsible for approximately 30% of annual carbon emissions. Missing from this dialogue, however, has been an appreciation for the embodied carbon of the actual materials from which the built environment is constructed. Industrial activity is responsible for approximately 40% of annual carbon emissions, of which half is tied to the production of concrete, steel, and aluminum alone. Concrete, steel, and aluminum are significant components of our built work as an interdisciplinary design firm, and we need to aggressively reduce the amounts of those materials we design in developing our clients’ built environments.

This week, we’ve been hosting teleconference meetings across our organization to share information that will help us in our quest to reduce embodied and operational carbon emissions from our design portfolio 50% by 2030.

These sessions included Baltimore City’s Sustainability Director, Lisa McNeilly, highlighting the creation of the Baltimore Sustainability Plan and how it’s been implemented and tracked. The Plan is framed to lead with equity and when plans, programs, and policies are implemented at the intersection of equity, economy, and the environment, outcomes are often more relevant, impactful, and longer lasting. FSi Engineers’ Ben Roush broke down the basic concepts and principles behind net-zero buildings and spoke on lessons learned over many net-zero projects. A trio of professionals from Thornton Tomasetti – Alexandra Davis, Christopher Williams, and Paul Becker – addressed why embodied carbon matters, how to identify carbon “hot spots” in a building, whether wood is truly good, and what questions architects should be asking structural engineers from the start to influence positive change and drive progress toward the AIA 2030 Commitment’s goals.

We reflect on our AIA 2030 Commitment results, the predicted energy use intensity of our whole building projects, and the lighting power density of our interiors projects. We’ve recorded this data since 2011, which enables us to recognize and reward the most energy efficient of these projects from the previous calendar year with our annual Carrot Awards to inspire other projects to strive for greater energy efficiency.

We believe sustainable design and great design are the same. Our highest performing projects under design in 2019 illustrate strategies every project in our firm aspires to achieve.

We’re pleased to announce this year’s Carrot Award winners are the Elon University Engineering and Physics Building and the Denison University Residence Hall Renovations. Congratulations to the design teams of these projects!

Elon University, Engineering and Physics Building
Elon University, Engineering and Physics Building

In collaboration with Walter Robbs Callahan & Pierce Architects, Ayers Saint Gross is designing a new Engineering and Physics Building for Elon University that will incorporate design fabrication space, prototyping equipment, and project assembly areas for the program’s engineering students. The project will expand the engineering program’s offerings and create a campus edge that will complete the quadrangle expansion between Moseley Hall and the existing Elon Elementary School. The building is composed of two parts: a three-story building that reflects the Greek Revival style of Elon University’s campus context and a two-story wing with a more modern aesthetic. Associated outdoor spaces will support community-building.

The Denison University Residence Hall Interior Renovations refresh existing residences for primarily first year students. Smith Hall, Shorney Hall, Curtis Hall, and Crawford Hall offer double and triple room options, but had limited space for community-building. For all of the halls, the entry sequence and ground floor common areas are being upgraded to provide a more open and welcoming experience. The renovations provide necessary outside the unit social spaces for residents and meet the needs of contemporary students. The new interior lighting design will reduce lighting power density by 77%, more than three times the current AIA 2030 reduction target for interior spaces, through daylighting and LED lighting.

Be on the lookout for more sustainability-focused projects from our firm. For more on how Ayers Saint Gross approaches sustainable design, see our firm’s sustainability strategy, Take Action.

The 2019 AIA Women’s Leadership Summit

November 5, 2019
Share

Equity, diversity, and inclusion are core values at Ayers Saint Gross and are vital to increasing the representation and advancement of women in architecture and design. This September, the AIA Women’s Leadership Summit was held in Minneapolis. Spanning three days and featuring dozens of workshops and speakers, more than 750 women architects and design professionals gathered at this important event, themed “Reframe. Rethink. Refresh.”

I have attended the past Women’s Leadership Summit programs with fellow colleague Elizabeth McLean, AIA; Seattle in 2015, Washington, DC in 2017 (I was fortunate to be on the Mid-Atlantic strategic planning committee) and this recent summit. Reflecting on this year (the largest attendance on record), it was interesting to see a diverse range of attendees in Minneapolis – in age, geographical representation, and many first-time attendees. For me, the summits provide both challenge and encouragement — replenishing my well year after year. The women pioneers around these issues in our industry come; Beverly Willis and Rosa Sheng, among others. And so do the local chapter committees, sole proprietors from rural practices, and the mid-level architect struggling with what’s next for her career. They each have an impactful story, a welcoming spirit, and a wave of commitment to our practice.

The summit was spent unpacking leadership styles, practicing active listening, and uncovering intentional impact areas. The benefits are not only personal but bring into focus the strengths needed to continue to support Ayers Saint Gross’s diverse clients and projects.

The metrics still show small growth for women as they progress through our profession and into leadership or more prominent design roles. The 2019 AIA Women’s Leadership Summit demonstrated a record number of women and firms committed to accelerating progress. It is this level of conversation that our profession deserves and requires to continue the hard work to bring about more equitable architecture. In addition to myself, Ayers Saint Gross was proudly represented by multiple attendees from across our offices. I am happy to share their thoughts and impressions.

Elizabeth McLean, AIA:

The AIA Women’s Leadership Summit strives to raise the profile of leadership in architecture, share and promote the design work of women, explore paths to leadership, and provide women the opportunity to learn from each other. This format crosses boundaries and allows for both strength and humility to shine. Our participation is important, with it we recognize individuals at different levels and support them to engage, learn, and extend the conversation when they each return to their offices and communities. The summit offered a space to share and grow; to reconnect.

This year’s gathering supported the conversation around moving forward and regrouping. I appreciated reframing the conversation. The public acknowledgement that every woman in architecture is a leader is powerful, and it provided the opportunity to be more inclusive and allow the numbers to increase the inspiration and potential for impact. It shifted focus beyond the individual and promoted empathy and generosity, acknowledging that leadership is empathetic and comes with accountability.

There is still a lack of women in leadership positions. We are urged and inspired to be on the forefront of confronting the issue and not only aware of it. The summit operated as a laboratory to test the potential for change across scales. There is an action-based emphasis on commitment and accountability. Considering formal and informal power, and large and small commitments, we challenged – What’s the stance, goal, commitment, and change? With this, there is meaningful purpose to gathering together.

Anya Grant, AIA:

As a first time attendee to the AIA Women’s Leadership Summit, I expected to be impressed by prominent women architects whose experiences paved the way and continue to clear a path for practicing architects like me. I was. What I didn’t expect was to also have the time and space to meaningfully engage with other women at various stages in the profession who are making their own mark as leaders. 

Through the medium of storytelling, we were guided through the personal accounts of women practicing in and reshaping the profession around the issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion. As we grapple with how to maintain a sense of inclusion in our profession, several presenters made a case for how it is not only relevant in our workplace, but also in engaging our clients. They raised the following question – whose voices are considered when design decisions are being made and how can we elevate the voices that are often unheard? One speaker, Malaz Elgemiabby described her efforts to meet community members on an individual basis when designing a community center. She not only learned about global needs that informed the design, but also points of neighborhood pride that were highlighted in murals. Pascale Sablan, in highlighting initiatives that promote diverse representation in architecture, described a community fellow position where a community member impacted by a design project is selected for a paid position to have a voice in regular design meetings. These accounts, among others, challenged us to think of the architect’s ability to engage and empower.

After days of stimulating conversations, we were invited by Pascale at the conclusion of her seminar, to turn to our neighbors and tell our own stories of leadership. This moment, where each woman spoke confidently of her ongoing work to shape our profession, highlighted the collective power of the hundreds of architects in attendance.

Nicole Ostrander, AIA:

Priya Parker, the keynote speaker, immediately set the tone of the summit as a supportive, collaborative, and empowering gathering of women, focused on storytelling. For the first several minutes of her session, we were encouraged to get up from our tables and step from our sphere of comfort to connect with new individuals by sharing a piece of own story with each other. Through this activity, Parker, author of The Art of Gathering:  How We Meet and Why it Matters was creating what she defines in her book as a transformational gathering. The AIA Women’s Leadership Summit was a created space in which attendees could open themselves to each other and forge connections. Parker provides excellent insight on how to give your gatherings purpose – whether a meeting, workshop, or dinner party – to create meaningful encounters.

Many of the sessions at the conference were focused on the topics of leadership, professional and personal development, and time management. With a range of women, all driven individuals at various points in their careers, there was a common narrative of navigating our own professional and personal responsibilities through shared experiences.

Teri Graham, AIA:

This was my first AIA Women’s Leadership Summit. It was powerful experience both in self-discovery and connection with other women with similar journey. We are not alone. The session “How To Set Your Career Path And Lead Authentically” presented by Jill Bergman, Katie Fricke, and Sandy Tkacz focused on self-discovery and connecting with others to advance in our careers. Emphasizing the importance of investing in yourself, the first step is to know thyself. Accomplished by growing your soft skills, assessing your skill gaps, and being resilient and proactive, you can be your own change maker. The next step discussed networking by both giving and receiving through finding an advocate and advocating. Career reflection points combined both know thyself and connecting through discussion on coaching, listening, taking ownership, understanding purpose, leading, and believing you are worth it. The big takeaway was we need to be a BRAT: Being Bold, Being Resourceful, Take Action, Have Tenacity.

Alice Brooks, AIA is an associate principal based out of the Baltimore office. Contact Alice.

Ayers Saint Gross at Advanced Building Skins

October 24, 2019
Share

Sustainability is a core Ayers Saint Gross value and resiliency is a crucial aspect of this goal. With much of the research and technology looking into new construction, it is important not to forget the sustainable possibilities of existing buildings.

On October 28, we will be presenting at the Advanced Building Skins Conference in Bern, Switzerland. This conference brings together Architects, Engineers, and Building Scientists (as well as material scientists and academic researchers from technical universities around the world) to share both the latest theoretical developments in building envelope technology and real-world experience and creative solutions as these advancements are put into practice. We will be presenting on the innovative double-thermal mass skin implemented as part of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Nelson Harvey Building Exterior Over-Cladding and Interior Renovation.

For hospital buildings in particular, where there can be no loss of patient care and the building must remain occupied, maximizing existing resources is paramount. By avoiding the carbon footprint associated with demolition and site work, applying inventive design solutions to existing buildings gains not only the sustainability advantages of new technologies, but also leads to an overall improvement, a substantial cost savings for the owner, and a reduced construction schedule.

For this project, forensic and visual observations of the façade disclosed severe thermal and moisture failures with decomposed flashing and lack of insulation. Similarly, the building was constructed without allowing thermal expansion vertically or horizontally of the building envelope, so areas of the façade were structurally failing, bowing, and delaminating. Like many buildings built over the last several decades, however, the structure was still sound.

Innovative solutions using thin precast concrete panels in combination with existing masonry created a hybrid double-skin envelope. In addition to all of the environmental benefits of ensuring the resiliency of the building, the double-thermal mass wall decreases heat transfer gain/loss through the building envelope for any given season and capitalizes on the high heat capacity of concrete and masonry to delay heat flow through the envelope by an action termed thermal lag. This results in a higher performing building.

We are happy to share these advancements and real-world applications with the world, and look forward to learning all the latest developments.

Luanne Greene in The Chronicle of Higher Education

October 10, 2019
Share
Luanne Greene, FAIA

As the premiere source for higher education journalism, The Chronicle of Higher Education serves their readers with current news, insightful opinions, helpful advice, and a robust career portal. The Chronicle also periodically takes deep dives into critical issues facing the college and university realm and publishes detailed reports. The special publication “The Campus as City,” features interviews with a diverse group of leaders across higher education. Included is Ayers Saint Gross President Luanne Greene, FAIA addressing the principles that bring cities and colleges together.

Colleges and universities are more invested in their relationships to their surrounding communities than ever before. This report investigates how colleges and universities perform many of the functions of a local municipality, but with constrained resources and heightened expectations. This fascinating and important report explores questions such as: how do you run a modern campus and keep functions like planning, transportation, and public safety at the forefront? What is the role of an anchor institution, and how does the surrounding community influence decisions that you make? How do you pursue responsible expansion and development?

Colby College, Alfond Commons
Alfond Commons at Colby College, featured in the publication, caters toward service-minded students and features a community forum on the ground floor.

Each campus environment brings its own history, challenges, goals, and sometimes resentments (indeed, the publication’s introduction cites clashes dating back to 1355). The questions are not new, but the strategies and creativity dedicated to resolving them is. In the piece, Luanne discusses the importance of developer relationships, looking ahead to future transit challenges, and the essential nature of having people and ideas near one another. These principles help guide our design thinking and cover practical concerns of infrastructure, scale, and environmental impact, as well as the ineffable qualities like the sense of place and intellectual buzz. Cities and campuses have a great deal to offer one another and their successes can be mutual. Ayers Saint Gross works to break down these barriers, and facilitate inclusivity.

Point225

Among the examples cited in the piece, the Providence Innovation District is a great example of these principles at work. Home to prestigious institutions including Brown University, Johnson & Wales University, and the Rhode Island School of Design, Providence is a place where many good ideas are being formed. Supported by developer partners and fulfilling the potential of the connection to the rest of the city opened by the re-routing of I-95/I-195, all those good ideas will have access to the business community and vice-versa. The resulting innovations (tech start-ups, new ideas for mature companies, research and development breakthroughs, among others) provide opportunity and feed back into the economy of the city. Point225, the first building implemented as part of the master plan, recently opened, and we are excited to see the results.

Place matters. For students, a campus is where some of the most memorable and intellectually rich moments of their lives may occur; for the community, it’s home; for faculty and staff it’s both. We are proud to share our involvement in The Chronicle’s publication and honored to play a role in the future of campuses and cities alike. See Luanne’s portion here.

Providence Innovation District Opens

August 27, 2019
Share

Recently, we celebrated the ribbon cutting for Point225 in Providence, Rhode Island. In attendance were the Governor of RI, Mayor of Providence, the President of Brown University, the I-195 Commission, the design team, and many more.

Point225, the first building implemented as part of the Providence Innovation District, is a project that carries extra significance for Ayers Saint Gross. As designers of both the building and the Providence Innovation District Master Plan, we are thrilled to see the vision come to life. The rerouting of I-95/I-195 in Providence created new developable land and removed a longtime barrier between the historic Jewelry District, home of Brown University’s medical school, and the city center. Reclaiming a brownfield, the plan envisions a million-square-foot mixed-use community containing housing, a new hotel, retail, labs, research space, and a variety of tech start-up spaces.

The building houses Brown University’s School of Professional Studies, Cambridge Innovation Center, and Johnson & Johnson, among others. These tenant anchors bring together academics, start-ups, and executives that provide mentorship and funding – a compelling mix that fosters innovation and acts as a catalyst for research and development. The signature building is a gateway that welcomes visitors, residents, and employees into the district with street-level retail and a lively streetscape. The architecture is dynamic, with movement on the facades that echo the vibrancy and excitement of the innovation happening within the district. At the core, a central green contains a one-story district hall that is open to the public and provides flexible meeting and dining space.

We are excited to design a platform that supports innovators and urban infrastructure—the entrepreneurs, the institutions, and the culture that make Providence such an iconic college town. In a city with prestigious universities, a strong arts community, and a friendly start-up environment, Providence is proving to be an ideal case study for innovation district success.

It is always striking at these events how many people and organizations it takes to make a building like this possible and the commitment it takes to make it a success. The project was an incredible team effort with a great process. The planning and implementation of this project has required the consistent coordination among Ayers Saint Gross as the designers, developer partners, higher education partners, tenants, and the city. This level of collaboration was crucial, and the celebration was well-deserved.

Ayers Saint Gross at ACUHO-I 2019

June 20, 2019
Share

We’re looking forward the ACUHO-I 2019 Conference and Expo in Toronto (June 22-25), and hope you’ll visit Ayers Saint Gross at booth 621. This is always an exciting time of year, as we connect with friends old and new, share our experience, and learn all the latest in student housing. We hope to see you there.

Be sure to pick up this year’s edition of our annual student housing book, Choose Your Student Experience.  It’s an interactive showcase of the creative ways we help colleges and universities craft a holistic student life experience through impactful, vibrant facilities. 

And join us for our educational session with Virginia Commonwealth University on the importance of designing for both private and communal spaces in student housing.

From Facility to Facilitator: Community, Privacy, and Inclusivity in Shared Spaces

For many first-year students, the residence hall is their first home outside of the family home. The most successful student housing facilities build a strong community among residents, while providing opportunities for the individual to have privacy when needed. Outside-the-unit spaces like lounges and laundry rooms are critical to community-building, while student units, even shared doubles, can be configured to provide moments of seclusion. Bathrooms are unique in that they bridge these two goals. Some daily activities demand privacy, while others confer an opportunity to strengthen the social connections formed through communal living. This program reviews case studies at Virginia Commonwealth University and other institutions to illustrate how thoughtfully designed outside-the-unit spaces and bathroom facilities in student housing can accommodate the individual’s need for privacy while building a sense of community and a culture of inclusion.

Presenters

Gavin Roark, Director of Residential Life & Housing,
Virginia Commonwealth University
Megan Becker, Ed.D., Associate Director of Residential Life,
Virginia Commonwealth University
Eric Moss, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Cooper Melton, Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross

Details

ACUHO-I 2019
Sunday, June 23, 2019
2:35 – 3:25 PM
Education Session 3
Room 712

Best Practices in Nursing School Design: Culture of Well-Being

May 30, 2019
Share

Ayers Saint Gross designs top-tier spaces to support educating nurses equipped to handle the future as healthcare delivery systems continue to transform. This two-part series dives into the influences that are changing the way nursing students learn and the way nursing faculty teach. Read Part 1.

Culture of Well-Being

Perhaps more than any other building type, schools of nursing and allied health have the special ability to promote health literacy and reflect the core values of their programs and the profession through building design and architecture. As healthcare delivery systems focus more on preventative approaches to health, lifestyle, and behavior, the design of the built environment should exemplify core values and be mindful of its impact on human health and wellness. Projects that want to advance healthy building strategies can seek WELL Certification to improve the health and well-being of its occupants.

Healthy building strategies that engage the mind and body include: incorporating biophilia through exposure to nature, activating interior circulation with prominent staircases, utilizing ergonomic and kinesthetic furniture to encourage occupant comfort, and addressing environmental needs for air, water, nourishment, and light. For example, designing flexible classrooms or exterior plazas to host fitness, wellness, or interprofessional events could be showcased as part of the building and professional outreach. Access to green spaces and natural light create healthier work and learning spaces for students, faculty, and staff. These design features become popular congregation spots, supporting a lively and collaborative culture.

Opening soon, the Duke University Physical Therapy / School of Nursing Education Building (designed by Ayers Saint Gross) will include a flexible seminar and wellness space for a variety of student activities. The room will function as a large seminar room for instruction, two small conference rooms for group meetings, or as a wellness hub for fitness and community outreach events. In the same vicinity, reservable low-speed treadmill workstations overlooking a landscaped garden will offer active furnishings to reduce the time faculty and students spend seated. Ergonomic furniture selection for both office and study areas is another important way that universities are promoting wellness.

Treadmill Workstations, Duke University Physical Therapy / School of Nursing Education Building
Low-speed treadmill workstations support wellness at Duke University

This type of flexibility in spaces has already proved successful at the University of West Georgia School of Nursing. A flexible seminar room off the building’s commons was designed as both a classroom and a yoga studio, utilizing an oversized barn-style door to allow overflow into the public spaces during a large wellness event.

Flexible Seminar Room, University of West Georgia School of Nursing
Flexible, multipurpose space at the University of West Georgia

Just as important, landscaped outdoor study areas provide meditative environments to support the well-being of students who will soon be supporting the well-being of so many others. 

University of West Georgia School of Nursing
Meditative outdoor space at the University of West Georgia

The culture of wellness in nursing and allied health extends beyond the school walls. Increasingly, schools want to be engaged in community health and gear curricula towards the regions they serve. This approach better prepares the workforce for local healthcare cases they will face in their careers. Whether it’s reaching patients in remote areas, screening clinics for a disease that’s especially prevalent in the community, or providing care at the student health clinic, it is a best practice of clinical education to consider these spaces.

University of Pikeville Health Professions Education Building
Skills learned at the University of Pikeville HPEB
help fulfill the health needs of the community

Community integration was embedded in the programming and mission of the recently launched Kentucky College of Optometry at the University of Pikeville Health Professions Education Building (HPEB). The school is in eastern Kentucky, a region with one of the highest rates of preventable blindness in the country. The HPEB includes a flexible classroom, assembly space, student lounge, study and meeting spaces, faculty offices, clinical skills labs, and an extensive primary care clinic with specialty operatory equipment. The project fulfills the university’s mission of service and defines the standard for excellence in optometric education and vision care in an area with an acute need.

Looking to the future, exciting developments in nursing education will broaden the impacts of community engagement and wellness. Interprofessional and cross-disciplinary education that engages other allied health disciplines and university majors like engineering can create dynamic teams to solve complex issues. Assistive technology and robotic solutions are continuing to advance healthcare. The built environment must support these developments with makerspaces and cross-disciplinary education labs to enable collaborations with engineering programs.

Understanding the latest technology and methodologies is crucial for students. Practical applications are seen in dementia care, where technology is facilitating seniors to live independently longer. To allow for easy monitoring, in-home devices record and send data about daily patterns to caregivers. Assistive devices are being developed to facilitate timely reminders for medication, locate items, or can trigger a comforting audio recording of a family member. Telepresence robots and companion robots can help improve mood or quality of life for people with dementia, to serve patients in a health crisis, and are finding their way into simulation-based education as a tool to practice communication and better prepare students for a career in nursing. Among the spaces that will be
located in the Duke University Physical Therapy / School of Nursing Education Building is the new Health Innovation Lab, which will provide for this interdisciplinary innovation and education.

As nursing schools plan for future curricula and building projects, Ayers Saint Gross will continue to lead the ways architecture can and should support the efforts of students, faculty, and staff to prepare the next generation of nurses for their careers. Educating highly qualified nurses and healthcare professionals fulfills a critical need, and well-designed spaces help meet this challenge. We look forward to seeing what the future holds, and working to create it.

Laura Hall, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP is an associate principal based out of the Baltimore office. Contact Laura.

Best Practices in Nursing School Design: Flexible and Adaptable Learning Environments

May 2, 2019
Share

Ayers Saint Gross designs top-tier spaces to support educating nurses equipped to handle the future as healthcare delivery systems continue to transform. This two-part series dives into the influences that are changing the way nursing students learn and the way nursing faculty teach. Read Part 2.

Flexible and Adaptable Learning Environments
Our allied health projects have flexibility embedded in the planning and organization of the spaces. Spaces that adapt to evolving methodology is essential as pedagogy, technology, healthcare demand, and specialized care needs shift. A well-designed building can be the framework that allows a program to endure changes and remain at the forefront of educating the modern workforce.

Creative and thoughtful design ensures clinical learning environments are both flexible (easily modified) and adaptable (able to serve a new use), while leveraging synergies and shared resources to maximize efficiencies. Considerate yet simple diagrams communicate the specific departmental aspects while illustrating where overlap exists and are the parti that translate into practical space layouts.

Concept Design – Frostburg State University Education & Health Sciences Center Department of Nursing
Concept Design – Frostburg State University Education & Health Sciences Center
Department of Nursing

Working with Frostburg State University, Ayers Saint Gross devised a concept to meet long-term goals for the Department of Nursing while adhering to the programmed space allocation. The inaugural Nursing program growth had surpassed the initial concepts outlined in the Part II program and future degree offerings necessitated a greater variety of space types. Understanding their drivers, we conceived two versions of an open skills lab that could also function as four dedicated simulation labs. Key adjacency to a flexible classroom essentially acts as a flex space to serve three functions: (1) a fully functional classroom, (2) a clinical learning class lab facilitating skills instruction and demonstration on the classroom side and hands-on implementation on the adjacent bays, and (3) a generous footprint for future simulation lab growth and program expansion. Providing a heightened level of flexibility with operable walls, mobile equipment, etc., allows instructors freedom to be creative in imagining scenarios.

As the healthcare delivery models evolve, Interprofessional Education (IPE) is becoming indispensable to modern health professions for the value it brings to education – providing hands-on collaborative clinical learning where students apply critical thinking to learn about and communicate with other disciplines in a safe environment. Initial space planning design should consider how the learning environments perform and transform to allow for a multitude of IPE scenarios and an influx of students and faculty from other health professions programs.

During design for the Auburn University School of Nursing, there was a distinct adjacency established between the large active learning classrooms, the building commons, and the outdoor greenspace for opportunities to host a variety of events. One success of this concept was realized during their inaugural Disaster Day Drill IPE event where Nursing and Osteopathic medicine students worked together to triage and treat patients in a large-format simulation. This scale and realism would not have been possible without Auburn and Ayers Saint Gross’s close collaboration and holistic approach to designing a building equipped to do more than standard skills training and instruction. The green space was transformed into triage spaces filled with simulated victims to be evaluated by the practicing students and the buildings’ EAGLES Center was transformed into the simulated hospital ER. “During the disaster drill, this spacious simulation area allowed for a total of 48 patients with 32 utilizing beds and 12 seated in chairs. The simulation area was divided into four “pods,” which acted as four separate hospital emergency departments.” Notably, the realism of this event prepared the osteopathic medical students to be tested for their Basic Disaster Life Support certification. The finale to the drill concluded in the dividable, flexible active learning classroom for a comprehensive group debrief.

As a formal learning environment, this space integrates technology and team-based learning, while also being flexible enough to test new pedagogies. A vertically folding operable partition expands the teaching environment to support a range of clinical learning scenarios. Down the hall, two collaborative tiered lecture classrooms allow for multiple learning arrangements, live demonstrations, and remote broadcasting.

Faculty and students acclaim that the new nursing building brings them together and note the impact of active learning environments being a “critical part of nursing education… specifically tailored to provide the necessary resources.” The space for informal learning, outside the classroom, was equally important to consider as classes scheduled in long segments necessitate spaces to inhabit during breaks. To maximize these options, the traditional prebrief and debrief rooms embedded in the simulation suite serve during off-hours as private or group study rooms. Occupants find that these spaces (with great daylight and views to campus) encourage faculty and students to engage for day-to-day interaction, capstone projects, and student organization meetings that supplement nursing training, such as global health initiative trips.

Adaptable Briefing Room Concept
Adaptable Briefing Room Concept

Ayers Saint Gross has designed three phases for Duke University’s School of Nursing. The Physical Therapy /School of Nursing Education Building bridges to the School of Nursing, continuing the expansion and consolidation of the school’s programs under one roof. The design team and user group worked extensively to conceive adaptable and flexible learning environments to meet their needs, focusing on strategies to mitigate resources taxed by the influx of distance learners during On-Campus Intensives. The design for a typical active learning classroom was adapted into three collaborative seminar spaces to supplement clinical learning, host workshops, and enable development in a state-of-the art learning environment.

Active Learning Classroom in Typical Configuration vs. On Campus Intensive Seminar Room Configuration
Active Learning Classroom in Typical Configuration vs. On Campus Intensive Seminar Room Configuration

The concept Ayers Saint Gross developed for Duke’s Standardized Patient Suite follows suit with maximizing adaptability and space utility. An “ante room” functions for charting, observation, post-exam evaluation, reflection, and as the separate entrance for the student or patient actor. The exam room side is fit out for a patient actor connected to a dedicated lounge and entry zone. Exam rooms are integrated with A/V capabilities and can also function for high-fidelity simulation utilizing a manikin.

Flexibility and adaptability are crucial, but these concepts are just the beginning. Join us for our next entry as we illustrate the importance and value of integrating wellness and community outreach into the design of nursing and health professions programs.

Laura Hall, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP is an associate principal based out of the Baltimore office. Contact Laura.

Green Week 2019: The Carrot Awards

April 17, 2019
Share

Ayers Saint Gross hosts an internal Green Week every year to advance sustainability literacy within our staff so we can provide better high-performance designs to our clients, reflect on our sustainability achievements to date, and plan for the year ahead.

Over the course of next week, we’re sharing information we’ve learned through project (or projects’) certifications, professional certifications, and conference attendance, as well as bringing in invited guests. We’re pleased to host Dr. Christine Sheppard of the American Bird Conservancy who will be speaking to our entire firm about Bird-Friendly Building Design. Anne Greenstone from Steelcase will be teaching our Baltimore office about the Fitwel certification and office wellness, and a representative from CMTA will teach our DC office more about design considerations for net-zero buildings.

Since 2011, we have annually reported the predicted energy use intensity of our whole building projects and the lighting power density of our interiors projects using the AIA 2030 Commitment. This data allows us to recognize and reward the most energy efficient of these projects from the previous calendar year with our annual Carrot Awards to inspire other projects to strive for greater energy efficiency.

We believe sustainable design and great design are the same. Our highest performing projects under design in 2018 illustrate strategies every project in our firm aspires to achieve.

We’re pleased to announce this year’s Carrot Award winners are the Hayden Library Reinvention at Arizona State University and the Brown Advisory Bond Street Office Third Floor Tenant Improvements. Congratulations to the design teams of these projects!

Hayden Library, originally built in 1966, is representative of a design and construction era that was limited by available technology and prioritized considerations for a library differently than today’s campus conditions require. The HVAC, lighting, plumbing, and architectural upgrades included as part of the library’s reinvention result in a significantly more resource-efficient building than the existing construction. The project is predicted to have an energy demand of 55% less than baseline and will offset a portion of its electricity load with a rooftop photovoltaic array. This work would not be possible without the collaboration of an engaged client and our team at Affiliated Engineers.

The Brown Advisory Headquarters Tenant Improvements provides commercial office space in Baltimore for a privately owned investment management company. The space we designed for them reduces lighting power density by 56%, more than twice the current AIA 2030 reduction target for interior spaces, through daylighting and LED lighting.

Be on the lookout for more sustainability-focused projects from our firm. For more on how Ayers Saint Gross approaches sustainable design, see our firm’s sustainability strategy, Take Action.

Ayers Saint Gross at SCUP Mid-Atlantic 2019

March 19, 2019
Share

The SCUP Mid-Atlantic Conference is March 20 – 22 at the University of Maryland, College Park. As a council member, I’m excited to be attending and hope you will join us. With the conference being so close to our DC and Baltimore offices, Ayers Saint Gross will have great representation, and I am looking forward to seeing many old friends and making new ones! Keep your eye out for Sally Chinnis, Alyson Goff, Adam Gross, Jordan Hawes, and Eric Zahn.

Thursday, March 21 is a big day for the firm, as we have two exciting concurrent sessions and a tour of the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center.

Student Engagement Leads to Thriving Residence Hall
This session will examine the successful process behind planning Trippe Hall, a residence hall at Penn State Behrend. The design process incorporated student input at various stages, from schematic design to furniture selection. Attracting prospective students means providing spaces where they want to cultivate their education and community. You will discover new ways to foster student engagement throughout your building design process, resulting in spaces that are ideal for today’s students.

Learning Outcomes
1. Involve students early in developing the program for your next campus building.
2. Create forums, panels, and surveys to collect end-user data that will inform the programming and design of your new building.
3. Create a student learning experience out of your new building project by giving them ownership over design ideas and allowing them to work through real-life plans and BIM models themselves.
4. Collect occupancy feedback from students after the building has opened; distribute surveys to students and then share your findings.

Presenters
Karen Kreger, Senior Director, Housing and Food Services, Commonwealth Campuses Pennsylvania State University
Michael Lindner, Director of Housing and Food Services,
Penn State Behrend
Jordan Hawes, Interior Designer, Ayers Saint Gross
Eric Zahn, Architect, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
8:30 AM – 9:30 AM
The Hotel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Calvert D

 

Measuring Classroom Performance: Design Process and Lessons Learned at University of Maryland
This session will explore how TERP (Teach, Engage, Respond, Participate) classrooms perform at the University of Maryland (UMD) Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center. You will learn how evidence-based design research supports budget, design, and utilization of active learning classrooms (ALC) by reviewing the ROI of TERP classroom performance, utilization, and learning outcomes assessment through student surveys. You will also establish criteria to measure ALC effectiveness and justify why increasing square footage and utilization accommodates collaborative learning in diverse disciplinary uses over the classroom’s lifecycle.

Learning Outcomes
1. Describe design attributes and performance criteria to be considered when designing formal and informal collaborative learning environments.
2. Summarize how to measure the impact that collaborative learning environments have on student learning outcomes.
3. Argue why collaborative learning environments are worth the additional funding and space.
4. Implement methods to collect student and faculty feedback in order to evaluate collaborative learning environment effectiveness.

Presenters
Elizabeth Beise, Professor, University of Maryland College Park
Alice Donlan, Director of Research, University of Maryland College Park
Adam Gross, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Kristen Ambrose, Principal, Director of Research and Development, Ratio (Former Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross)

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
The Hotel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Calvert C

 

Tour: Active Learning at the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center
The presentation and tour of the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center at the University of Maryland, College Park will be conducted with a brief presentation of planning, programming, and design concepts for the 187,400 gross square feet LEED Gold academic building. The tour will highlight innovations in active learning classroom design for large enrollment undergraduate courses.

Learning Outcomes
1. Review space guidelines for a teaching and learning center and understand the limitations of regulated state guidelines and standards that influence the design of active learning classrooms.
2. Prioritize space attributes and performance criteria to be considered when designing an active learning environment and describe the process of collecting precedent research and analyzing relevant examples.
3. Identify design criteria for learning environment design that considers universal design principles for diverse pedagogical approaches and access resources to produce a furniture mock-up of a proposed design condition that meets universal accessibility and ADA requirements.
4. Implement methods to collect student and faculty feedback and develop survey questions to create a post-occupancy evaluation survey for occupants to evaluate the effectiveness of learning spaces.

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM