First Annual Jim Wheeler Day of Service

July 26, 2019
Share

“We engage people and places to create designs that enrich the world.” This philosophy guides our design thinking for our clients and is a standard to which we hold ourselves. Putting our values into action across our offices in Baltimore, Tempe, and Washington DC, this spring we held the Jim Wheeler Day of Service. Named in honor of our former president and current chairman of the board, this is a day for us as a firm to give back to the communities where we live and work.

When Jim Wheeler came to Ayers Saint Gross in 1987, the firm was already 75 years old with a venerable history and deep local traditions, but also ready to transform itself. He saw a collection of people willing and eager to take on the future – and change. That’s what Jim has always been about, and still is.

When it came to connecting with our communities, Jim understood the importance of giving back, which led him to the United Way early in his career. When the challenge of leading the United Way board of directors came along, Jim saw a chance for growth and change – in the United Way and in himself. He helped lead them to pioneering projects and a new home.

This is a legacy we seek to live up to by continuing in this example and expanding our reach. We are happy to continue our long relationship with United Way and to forge new bonds with non-profits nationwide. The activities for the Jim Wheeler Day of Service included neighborhood cleanups, helping create parks, gardens, and greenspace in the inner city, volunteering at food banks and kitchens, Habitat for Humanity, and helping at local elementary schools.

We look forward to repeating the success of the day for many years to come and are happy to share these images from the events. We encourage others to get involved with these great organizations.

DC Central Kitchen
United Way – Maree G. Farring Elementary School
City of Refuge
Duncan Street Miracle Garden
Maryland Food Bank
Arizona Habitat for Humanity
Kirby Lane Park

Ayers Saint Gross at SCUP 2019

July 11, 2019
Share

The SCUP 2019 Annual Conference is being held in Seattle this year, and we are pleased to have an abundance of good news to share in the Emerald City.

Ayers Saint Gross has won the SCUP Excellence Award in Landscape Architecture for General Design for the San Martin Drive Pedestrian Improvements at Johns Hopkins University. The project highlights a natural asset while improving the safety and well-being of students. The landscape design incorporates four major elements: defining a continuous pedestrian connection the length of the corridor, developing clear and safe crossings of the roadway, creatively resolving the need for pedestrian connections in an environmentally sensitive area, and establishing clear entry gates to the University. We are happy to announce the honor and proud of this project and our design team for their incredible and life-changing work.


Firm President Luanne Greene, FAIA is featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education’s special publication “The Campus as City,” addressing the principles that bring cities and colleges together. No matter what their size, colleges and universities are more invested in their relationships to their surrounding communities than ever before. In the piece, Luanne discusses the importance of developer relationships (the Cortex Innovation District and the Providence Innovation District being prime examples), looking ahead to future transit challenges, and the essential nature of having people and ideas in close proximity to one another. These principles help guide our design thinking and cover practical concerns of infrastructure, scale, and environmental impact, as well as the ineffable qualities like the sense of place and intellectual buzz.


A new year at SCUP also means a new Comparing Campuses poster. Since 1998, Ayers Saint Gross has annually published this poster featuring campus plans from leading institutions around the world. After a number of years focusing on specific themes, this year’s poster is a recall to our original style and features eleven new additions to our collection. Featuring a mix of large and small campuses and punctuated with sustainability facts, we’ve assembled this collection as a tool for institutional planners in the belief that understanding campus organization and data will lead to the creation of even better spaces in which to live, learn, and teach.

We look forward to seeing everyone at the conference. Come and visit us at booth 401.

Collaboration Day 2019

July 3, 2019
Share

Collaboration is a hallmark of our design process and a key value of our firm. Every few years Ayers Saint Gross brings together all employees across our three offices for a day-long gathering known as Collaboration Day. This is an opportunity to put our values into practice, share experiences with colleagues, recognize and reward exemplary efforts, and, ultimately, bring the inspiration gained from the day into our work for our clients.

While collaboration is the purpose of the day, creativity is really what it’s all about. We opened up with an art show titled “Intersections” on the evening before Collaboration Day’s formal start. Employees from all offices and discipline groups entered their original artwork for display. There were paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, and more. It is always striking to see just how much energy and passion our colleagues bring to their creative endeavors outside of work as well.

The following morning, we gathered at the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore. The day was filled with informative presentations and valuable interactions. We shared examples of our work and vision of excellence. Seeing the expertise that our employees bring and the understanding and appreciation gained for what others do is incredibly valuable. We also spent time reviewing our impact in the community with which we live and work. We believe that giving back is an essential part of collaboration.

Rounding out the day, we acknowledged and rewarded exceptional collaboration with the presentation of the Lex Schwartz Collaboration Awards. Inspired by our long-time mentor and master collaborator, Lex Schwartz, this annual award recognizes the highest level of leadership in collaboration for the betterment of our projects and clients, our firm and employees, and the communities we serve. The awards are given both to a project team and an individual. We were extremely proud to award these honors to the Whittle School and Studios team, and to Principal and Interior Designer, Linnea Kessler-Gowell.

Collaboration Day reiterates the vital importance of investing in people. The creativity of our staff and the inspiration we give to one another pushes all of us to deliver the very best for our clients. Kevin Jones, Associate, Architect, and a leader in the Employee Ownership and Finance Committee, summed this up beautifully during the event. Enjoy his words and video highlights from the day. We can’t wait to share what our team comes up with next.

Ayers Saint Gross at ACUHO-I 2019

June 20, 2019
Share

We’re looking forward the ACUHO-I 2019 Conference and Expo in Toronto (June 22-25), and hope you’ll visit Ayers Saint Gross at booth 621. This is always an exciting time of year, as we connect with friends old and new, share our experience, and learn all the latest in student housing. We hope to see you there.

Be sure to pick up this year’s edition of our annual student housing book, Choose Your Student Experience.  It’s an interactive showcase of the creative ways we help colleges and universities craft a holistic student life experience through impactful, vibrant facilities. 

And join us for our educational session with Virginia Commonwealth University on the importance of designing for both private and communal spaces in student housing.

From Facility to Facilitator: Community, Privacy, and Inclusivity in Shared Spaces

For many first-year students, the residence hall is their first home outside of the family home. The most successful student housing facilities build a strong community among residents, while providing opportunities for the individual to have privacy when needed. Outside-the-unit spaces like lounges and laundry rooms are critical to community-building, while student units, even shared doubles, can be configured to provide moments of seclusion. Bathrooms are unique in that they bridge these two goals. Some daily activities demand privacy, while others confer an opportunity to strengthen the social connections formed through communal living. This program reviews case studies at Virginia Commonwealth University and other institutions to illustrate how thoughtfully designed outside-the-unit spaces and bathroom facilities in student housing can accommodate the individual’s need for privacy while building a sense of community and a culture of inclusion.

Presenters

Gavin Roark, Director of Residential Life & Housing,
Virginia Commonwealth University
Megan Becker, Ed.D., Associate Director of Residential Life,
Virginia Commonwealth University
Eric Moss, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Cooper Melton, Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross

Details

ACUHO-I 2019
Sunday, June 23, 2019
2:35 – 3:25 PM
Education Session 3
Room 712

Best Practices in Nursing School Design: Culture of Well-Being

May 30, 2019
Share

Ayers Saint Gross designs top-tier spaces to support educating nurses equipped to handle the future as healthcare delivery systems continue to transform. This two-part series dives into the influences that are changing the way nursing students learn and the way nursing faculty teach. Read Part 1.

Culture of Well-Being

Perhaps more than any other building type, schools of nursing and allied health have the special ability to promote health literacy and reflect the core values of their programs and the profession through building design and architecture. As healthcare delivery systems focus more on preventative approaches to health, lifestyle, and behavior, the design of the built environment should exemplify core values and be mindful of its impact on human health and wellness. Projects that want to advance healthy building strategies can seek WELL Certification to improve the health and well-being of its occupants.

Healthy building strategies that engage the mind and body include: incorporating biophilia through exposure to nature, activating interior circulation with prominent staircases, utilizing ergonomic and kinesthetic furniture to encourage occupant comfort, and addressing environmental needs for air, water, nourishment, and light. For example, designing flexible classrooms or exterior plazas to host fitness, wellness, or interprofessional events could be showcased as part of the building and professional outreach. Access to green spaces and natural light create healthier work and learning spaces for students, faculty, and staff. These design features become popular congregation spots, supporting a lively and collaborative culture.

Opening soon, the Duke University Physical Therapy / School of Nursing Education Building (designed by Ayers Saint Gross) will include a flexible seminar and wellness space for a variety of student activities. The room will function as a large seminar room for instruction, two small conference rooms for group meetings, or as a wellness hub for fitness and community outreach events. In the same vicinity, reservable low-speed treadmill workstations overlooking a landscaped garden will offer active furnishings to reduce the time faculty and students spend seated. Ergonomic furniture selection for both office and study areas is another important way that universities are promoting wellness.

Treadmill Workstations, Duke University Physical Therapy / School of Nursing Education Building
Low-speed treadmill workstations support wellness at Duke University

This type of flexibility in spaces has already proved successful at the University of West Georgia School of Nursing. A flexible seminar room off the building’s commons was designed as both a classroom and a yoga studio, utilizing an oversized barn-style door to allow overflow into the public spaces during a large wellness event.

Flexible Seminar Room, University of West Georgia School of Nursing
Flexible, multipurpose space at the University of West Georgia

Just as important, landscaped outdoor study areas provide meditative environments to support the well-being of students who will soon be supporting the well-being of so many others. 

University of West Georgia School of Nursing
Meditative outdoor space at the University of West Georgia

The culture of wellness in nursing and allied health extends beyond the school walls. Increasingly, schools want to be engaged in community health and gear curricula towards the regions they serve. This approach better prepares the workforce for local healthcare cases they will face in their careers. Whether it’s reaching patients in remote areas, screening clinics for a disease that’s especially prevalent in the community, or providing care at the student health clinic, it is a best practice of clinical education to consider these spaces.

University of Pikeville Health Professions Education Building
Skills learned at the University of Pikeville HPEB
help fulfill the health needs of the community

Community integration was embedded in the programming and mission of the recently launched Kentucky College of Optometry at the University of Pikeville Health Professions Education Building (HPEB). The school is in eastern Kentucky, a region with one of the highest rates of preventable blindness in the country. The HPEB includes a flexible classroom, assembly space, student lounge, study and meeting spaces, faculty offices, clinical skills labs, and an extensive primary care clinic with specialty operatory equipment. The project fulfills the university’s mission of service and defines the standard for excellence in optometric education and vision care in an area with an acute need.

Looking to the future, exciting developments in nursing education will broaden the impacts of community engagement and wellness. Interprofessional and cross-disciplinary education that engages other allied health disciplines and university majors like engineering can create dynamic teams to solve complex issues. Assistive technology and robotic solutions are continuing to advance healthcare. The built environment must support these developments with makerspaces and cross-disciplinary education labs to enable collaborations with engineering programs.

Understanding the latest technology and methodologies is crucial for students. Practical applications are seen in dementia care, where technology is facilitating seniors to live independently longer. To allow for easy monitoring, in-home devices record and send data about daily patterns to caregivers. Assistive devices are being developed to facilitate timely reminders for medication, locate items, or can trigger a comforting audio recording of a family member. Telepresence robots and companion robots can help improve mood or quality of life for people with dementia, to serve patients in a health crisis, and are finding their way into simulation-based education as a tool to practice communication and better prepare students for a career in nursing. Among the spaces that will be
located in the Duke University Physical Therapy / School of Nursing Education Building is the new Health Innovation Lab, which will provide for this interdisciplinary innovation and education.

As nursing schools plan for future curricula and building projects, Ayers Saint Gross will continue to lead the ways architecture can and should support the efforts of students, faculty, and staff to prepare the next generation of nurses for their careers. Educating highly qualified nurses and healthcare professionals fulfills a critical need, and well-designed spaces help meet this challenge. We look forward to seeing what the future holds, and working to create it.

Best Practices in Nursing School Design: Flexible and Adaptable Learning Environments

May 2, 2019
Share

Ayers Saint Gross designs top-tier spaces to support educating nurses equipped to handle the future as healthcare delivery systems continue to transform. This two-part series dives into the influences that are changing the way nursing students learn and the way nursing faculty teach.

Flexible and Adaptable Learning Environments
Our allied health projects have flexibility embedded in the planning and organization of the spaces. Spaces that adapt to evolving methodology is essential as pedagogy, technology, healthcare demand, and specialized care needs shift. A well-designed building can be the framework that allows a program to endure changes and remain at the forefront of educating the modern workforce.

Creative and thoughtful design ensures clinical learning environments are both flexible (easily modified) and adaptable (able to serve a new use), while leveraging synergies and shared resources to maximize efficiencies. Considerate yet simple diagrams communicate the specific departmental aspects while illustrating where overlap exists and are the parti that translate into practical space layouts.

Concept Design – Frostburg State University Education & Health Sciences Center Department of Nursing
Concept Design – Frostburg State University Education & Health Sciences Center
Department of Nursing

Working with Frostburg State University, Ayers Saint Gross devised a concept to meet long-term goals for the Department of Nursing while adhering to the programmed space allocation. The inaugural Nursing program growth had surpassed the initial concepts outlined in the Part II program and future degree offerings necessitated a greater variety of space types. Understanding their drivers, we conceived two versions of an open skills lab that could also function as four dedicated simulation labs. Key adjacency to a flexible classroom essentially acts as a flex space to serve three functions: (1) a fully functional classroom, (2) a clinical learning class lab facilitating skills instruction and demonstration on the classroom side and hands-on implementation on the adjacent bays, and (3) a generous footprint for future simulation lab growth and program expansion. Providing a heightened level of flexibility with operable walls, mobile equipment, etc., allows instructors freedom to be creative in imagining scenarios.

As the healthcare delivery models evolve, Interprofessional Education (IPE) is becoming indispensable to modern health professions for the value it brings to education – providing hands-on collaborative clinical learning where students apply critical thinking to learn about and communicate with other disciplines in a safe environment. Initial space planning design should consider how the learning environments perform and transform to allow for a multitude of IPE scenarios and an influx of students and faculty from other health professions programs.

During design for the Auburn University School of Nursing, there was a distinct adjacency established between the large active learning classrooms, the building commons, and the outdoor greenspace for opportunities to host a variety of events. One success of this concept was realized during their inaugural Disaster Day Drill IPE event where Nursing and Osteopathic medicine students worked together to triage and treat patients in a large-format simulation. This scale and realism would not have been possible without Auburn and Ayers Saint Gross’s close collaboration and holistic approach to designing a building equipped to do more than standard skills training and instruction. The green space was transformed into triage spaces filled with simulated victims to be evaluated by the practicing students and the buildings’ EAGLES Center was transformed into the simulated hospital ER. “During the disaster drill, this spacious simulation area allowed for a total of 48 patients with 32 utilizing beds and 12 seated in chairs. The simulation area was divided into four “pods,” which acted as four separate hospital emergency departments.” Notably, the realism of this event prepared the osteopathic medical students to be tested for their Basic Disaster Life Support certification. The finale to the drill concluded in the dividable, flexible active learning classroom for a comprehensive group debrief.

As a formal learning environment, this space integrates technology and team-based learning, while also being flexible enough to test new pedagogies. A vertically folding operable partition expands the teaching environment to support a range of clinical learning scenarios. Down the hall, two collaborative tiered lecture classrooms allow for multiple learning arrangements, live demonstrations, and remote broadcasting.

Faculty and students acclaim that the new nursing building brings them together and note the impact of active learning environments being a “critical part of nursing education… specifically tailored to provide the necessary resources.” The space for informal learning, outside the classroom, was equally important to consider as classes scheduled in long segments necessitate spaces to inhabit during breaks. To maximize these options, the traditional prebrief and debrief rooms embedded in the simulation suite serve during off-hours as private or group study rooms. Occupants find that these spaces (with great daylight and views to campus) encourage faculty and students to engage for day-to-day interaction, capstone projects, and student organization meetings that supplement nursing training, such as global health initiative trips.

Adaptable Briefing Room Concept
Adaptable Briefing Room Concept

Ayers Saint Gross has designed three phases for Duke University’s School of Nursing. The Physical Therapy /School of Nursing Education Building bridges to the School of Nursing, continuing the expansion and consolidation of the school’s programs under one roof. The design team and user group worked extensively to conceive adaptable and flexible learning environments to meet their needs, focusing on strategies to mitigate resources taxed by the influx of distance learners during On-Campus Intensives. The design for a typical active learning classroom was adapted into three collaborative seminar spaces to supplement clinical learning, host workshops, and enable development in a state-of-the art learning environment.

Active Learning Classroom in Typical Configuration vs. On Campus Intensive Seminar Room Configuration
Active Learning Classroom in Typical Configuration vs. On Campus Intensive Seminar Room Configuration

The concept Ayers Saint Gross developed for Duke’s Standardized Patient Suite follows suit with maximizing adaptability and space utility. An “ante room” functions for charting, observation, post-exam evaluation, reflection, and as the separate entrance for the student or patient actor. The exam room side is fit out for a patient actor connected to a dedicated lounge and entry zone. Exam rooms are integrated with A/V capabilities and can also function for high-fidelity simulation utilizing a manikin.

Flexibility and adaptability are crucial, but these concepts are just the beginning. Join us for our next entry as we illustrate the importance and value of integrating wellness and community outreach into the design of nursing and health professions programs.

Space Analytics Round-Up

April 23, 2019
The Ayers Saint Gross Space Analytics Team
Share

The discipline of space analytics is precisely what it sounds like: a study and quantification of existing space and a projection of current and future needs. This analysis serves as the foundation for our iterative process to identify challenges and opportunities, develop strategies, and build consensus and buy-in. Without rigorous analysis, use of capital resources is just guesswork – and guesswork can be costly. The Ayers Saint Gross team uses a range of tools, including space needs assessment, space utilization, facilities audit, programming, and comparative analysis to help institutions gain a better understanding of space allocations and needs, and to effectively communicate their findings to a variety of stakeholders.

It has been an been an eventful time for Ayers Saint Gross’ Space Analytics group, and there is much more to be excited about moving forward. On April 23 and 24, we are leading a space management workshop at The Catholic University of America, hosted by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP). This deep-dive, hands-on workshop will walk through the steps to create a robust data space management system, looking at the various inputs from other data sources needed for decision-making, space metrics to consider for implementation within internal space planning processes, and space management policies and procedures to consider. Attendees will walk away with tools, confidence, and real-life examples of how to communicate the value of space planning, identify and prioritize needs, and connect space planning into your institution’s integrated plan.

Ayers Saint Gross works with many higher education clients of varying sizes, locations, and missions, and our firm was recently featured in Business Officer magazine, the publication of the National Association of College and University Business Officers. The article, titled “The Politics of Space” explores the nuances of space needs (more isn’t always better) and features three key tips from Lisa Keith, the leader of the Space Analytics group.

Lisa was also featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education article “How to Use Data, Not Emotion, To Apportion Precious Space on Campus.” In it, she notes that higher education is shifting away from qualitative-only measures of competing wants and needs of multiple campus constituencies. In its place, a data-driven approach to space allocation and capital investment has taken its place. The Chronicle story quotes Mark Reed, the VP for Finance and Administration at Moravian College, noting the resonance of our firm’s proprietary cloud-based software (and end result of the rigorous and multi-faceted analysis our team performs) SAMiTM when it comes to visualizing and understanding complex space needs. To share more about what SAMi™ does, we created a video available here.

We’ve also created a discipline book with institutional case studies and a technology toolbox, which is available online and in print upon request.

We’re excited to see our work highlighted in these industry-leading publications, and look forward to working with more colleges, universities, and institutions to guide decisions about the highest and best use of their physical resources. If you’re interested in these projects and the rest of our services offered, I hope you’ll reach out to learn more.

Green Week 2019: The Carrot Awards

April 17, 2019
Share

Ayers Saint Gross hosts an internal Green Week every year to advance sustainability literacy within our staff so we can provide better high-performance designs to our clients, reflect on our sustainability achievements to date, and plan for the year ahead.

Over the course of next week, we’re sharing information we’ve learned through project (or projects’) certifications, professional certifications, and conference attendance, as well as bringing in invited guests. We’re pleased to host Dr. Christine Sheppard of the American Bird Conservancy who will be speaking to our entire firm about Bird-Friendly Building Design. Anne Greenstone from Steelcase will be teaching our Baltimore office about the Fitwel certification and office wellness, and a representative from CMTA will teach our DC office more about design considerations for net-zero buildings.

Since 2011, we have annually reported the predicted energy use intensity of our whole building projects and the lighting power density of our interiors projects using the AIA 2030 Commitment. This data allows us to recognize and reward the most energy efficient of these projects from the previous calendar year with our annual Carrot Awards to inspire other projects to strive for greater energy efficiency.

We believe sustainable design and great design are the same. Our highest performing projects under design in 2018 illustrate strategies every project in our firm aspires to achieve.

We’re pleased to announce this year’s Carrot Award winners are the Hayden Library Reinvention at Arizona State University and the Brown Advisory Bond Street Office Third Floor Tenant Improvements. Congratulations to the design teams of these projects!

Hayden Library, originally built in 1966, is representative of a design and construction era that was limited by available technology and prioritized considerations for a library differently than today’s campus conditions require. The HVAC, lighting, plumbing, and architectural upgrades included as part of the library’s reinvention result in a significantly more resource-efficient building than the existing construction. The project is predicted to have an energy demand of 55% less than baseline and will offset a portion of its electricity load with a rooftop photovoltaic array. This work would not be possible without the collaboration of an engaged client and our team at Affiliated Engineers.

The Brown Advisory Headquarters Tenant Improvements provides commercial office space in Baltimore for a privately owned investment management company. The space we designed for them reduces lighting power density by 56%, more than twice the current AIA 2030 reduction target for interior spaces, through daylighting and LED lighting.

Be on the lookout for more sustainability-focused projects from our firm. For more on how Ayers Saint Gross approaches sustainable design, see our firm’s sustainability strategy, Take Action.

Announcing our 2019 Promotions

April 11, 2019
Share

Join us as we congratulate these outstanding individuals on their well-deserved promotions. As an employee-owned firm, our people are our greatest strength. We are thrilled to recognize the following leaders who engage people and places to create designs that enrich our world.

PRINCIPALS

Corey Chang, Architecture

Throughout his career, Corey has led an array of higher education projects, including academic and research facilities with a focus on health sciences, nursing, and STEM. He delivers the highest caliber of service with his attentiveness to an institution’s needs coupled with responsive designs and execution of the details. Corey is a leader in our employee-owned business structure, ensuring that everyone is engaged and invested in the success of the firm.

Joel Fidler, Architecture

Joel leads with a clear architectural vision and open communication to discover what drives clients’ needs. His experience ranges from college and university campuses and local school systems to housing and commercial development. Joel is the President of AIA Maryland and has served on its Board of Directors since 2016.

Christine Hurt, Finance

Christine is Chief Financial Officer of Ayers Saint Gross. Her expertise includes corporate accounting, financial reporting and analysis, budgeting, audit requirements, regulatory reporting, treasury management, tax compliance, and risk management. Christine is on the Board of Trustees for the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra and recently held leadership positions at her church and with Boy Scouts of America.

Linnea Kessler-Gowell, Interiors

Linnea has deep expertise as an interior designer for higher education and multifamily projects with significant experience on interior renovations, including detailed furniture, fixtures, and equipment packages. Bringing valuable knowledge from work on the client side, she understands how to best design vibrant and integrated interior environments for flexible learning and living, keeping maintenance and costs in mind.

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPALS

Sally Chinnis, Planning

A campus planner and urban designer, Sally helps institutions create dynamic mixed-use precincts, enhance the student and residential experience, expand open space networks, and develop phased implementation plans to realize their vision. Her projects span strategic planning, programming, and physical planning for university campuses and individual schools, colleges, and administrative units.

Alyson Goff, Space Analytics

With practical knowledge at the governing board and campus levels, Alyson understands the inner workings of higher education and possesses deep understanding of institutional operations. Through analysis and planning of short- and long-term space needs, she provides valuable insight to institutions to inform their space planning and management strategies, allowing institutions to align academic, financial, and physical planning goals.

Hans Graf, Architecture

Hans has dedicated his career to the design of student life buildings, with a particular focus on residence halls that elevate the living-learning experience. Working closely with residence life departments, the office of facilities, and other stakeholders at colleges and universities to verify their programming needs and then translate them into built forms, Hans envisions and executes innovative and creative designs.

Katy Hunchar, Marketing and Business Development

Katy is the firm’s Director of Marketing and Business Development. With more than 12 years of experience working with design firms, she leads strategic marketing and business development efforts across all disciplines for higher education, cultural institutions, and other mission-driven clients.

Jessica Leonard, Planning and Architecture

Jessica brings comprehensive programming, space planning, strategic planning, and design skills to the firm. She leads large, complex master planning efforts and is passionate about engaging stakeholders to guide decisions that shape the character of an institution and its vision for the future. Jessica is a member of SCUP and received the Alpha Rho Chi Medal and a University Fellowship from the University of Maryland. She is a founder of the SHARPkids program in Baltimore City, where she also serves as a youth mentor.

Cooper Melton, Architecture

Cooper has devoted his design practice to housing and higher education, steering successful and award-winning projects to completion. Cooper’s extensive background in both market-rate and student housing allows him to find inventive solutions that bridge the goals of the private sector with the ideals of academic institutions. Cooper has spoken at national and regional conferences, including ACUHO-I and SEAHO.

SENIOR ASSOCIATES

Erin Estep, Architecture

Laura Hall, Architecture

Cormac Phalen, Architecture

Angelo Pirali, Architecture

William Story, Planning

Michael Taylor, Architecture

Amber Wendland, Planning

ASSOCIATES

Bohdan Baida, Space Analytics

Matthew Doeller, Architecture

Igor Hercegovac, Architecture

John Kucia, Architecture

Olivia Law, Architecture

Beresford Pratt, Architecture

Tim Smiroldo, Architecture

Stephen Turk, Marketing and Business Development


ART DIRECTOR

Margaret Zivkovich, Graphic Design

*Illustrations by Katy Hunchar

Ayers Saint Gross at SCUP Mid-Atlantic 2019

March 19, 2019
Share

The SCUP Mid-Atlantic Conference is March 20 – 22 at the University of Maryland, College Park. As a council member, I’m excited to be attending and hope you will join us. With the conference being so close to our DC and Baltimore offices, Ayers Saint Gross will have great representation, and I am looking forward to seeing many old friends and making new ones! Keep your eye out for Sally Chinnis, Alyson Goff, Adam Gross, Jordan Hawes, and Eric Zahn.

Thursday, March 21 is a big day for the firm, as we have two exciting concurrent sessions and a tour of the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center.

Student Engagement Leads to Thriving Residence Hall
This session will examine the successful process behind planning Trippe Hall, a residence hall at Penn State Behrend. The design process incorporated student input at various stages, from schematic design to furniture selection. Attracting prospective students means providing spaces where they want to cultivate their education and community. You will discover new ways to foster student engagement throughout your building design process, resulting in spaces that are ideal for today’s students.

Learning Outcomes
1. Involve students early in developing the program for your next campus building.
2. Create forums, panels, and surveys to collect end-user data that will inform the programming and design of your new building.
3. Create a student learning experience out of your new building project by giving them ownership over design ideas and allowing them to work through real-life plans and BIM models themselves.
4. Collect occupancy feedback from students after the building has opened; distribute surveys to students and then share your findings.

Presenters
Karen Kreger, Senior Director, Housing and Food Services, Commonwealth Campuses Pennsylvania State University
Michael Lindner, Director of Housing and Food Services,
Penn State Behrend
Jordan Hawes, Interior Designer, Ayers Saint Gross
Eric Zahn, Architect, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
8:30 AM – 9:30 AM
The Hotel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Calvert D

 

Measuring Classroom Performance: Design Process and Lessons Learned at University of Maryland
This session will explore how TERP (Teach, Engage, Respond, Participate) classrooms perform at the University of Maryland (UMD) Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center. You will learn how evidence-based design research supports budget, design, and utilization of active learning classrooms (ALC) by reviewing the ROI of TERP classroom performance, utilization, and learning outcomes assessment through student surveys. You will also establish criteria to measure ALC effectiveness and justify why increasing square footage and utilization accommodates collaborative learning in diverse disciplinary uses over the classroom’s lifecycle.

Learning Outcomes
1. Describe design attributes and performance criteria to be considered when designing formal and informal collaborative learning environments.
2. Summarize how to measure the impact that collaborative learning environments have on student learning outcomes.
3. Argue why collaborative learning environments are worth the additional funding and space.
4. Implement methods to collect student and faculty feedback in order to evaluate collaborative learning environment effectiveness.

Presenters
Elizabeth Beise, Professor, University of Maryland College Park
Alice Donlan, Director of Research, University of Maryland College Park
Adam Gross, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Kristen Ambrose, Principal, Director of Research and Development, Ratio (Former Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross)

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
The Hotel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Calvert C

 

Tour: Active Learning at the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center
The presentation and tour of the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center at the University of Maryland, College Park will be conducted with a brief presentation of planning, programming, and design concepts for the 187,400 gross square feet LEED Gold academic building. The tour will highlight innovations in active learning classroom design for large enrollment undergraduate courses.

Learning Outcomes
1. Review space guidelines for a teaching and learning center and understand the limitations of regulated state guidelines and standards that influence the design of active learning classrooms.
2. Prioritize space attributes and performance criteria to be considered when designing an active learning environment and describe the process of collecting precedent research and analyzing relevant examples.
3. Identify design criteria for learning environment design that considers universal design principles for diverse pedagogical approaches and access resources to produce a furniture mock-up of a proposed design condition that meets universal accessibility and ADA requirements.
4. Implement methods to collect student and faculty feedback and develop survey questions to create a post-occupancy evaluation survey for occupants to evaluate the effectiveness of learning spaces.

Details
Thursday, March 21, 2019
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Ayers Saint Gross Completes JUST Disclosure

March 4, 2019
Share

We’re excited to announce that our firm’s JUST Disclosure went live this week, check it out online here.

JUST is a voluntary reporting tool developed by the International Living Future Institute for organizations to describe operational, social, and financial actions that contribute to what equity looks like at that organization. The program includes 21 different social justice and equity indicators within six categories. Each indicator has three levels of achievement and reporting that must be updated at regular intervals to maintain a JUST Disclosure. Participants in JUST must disclose information on at least 18 of the 21 indicators and can only opt out of at most one indicator per category.

Our firm’s definition of sustainability has always recognized the careful balance between the unique needs of people and ecological systems with the economic realities inherent in each of our projects. Today we advance our commitment to sustainability by sharing more quantitative data about the social equity and justice issues embedded in who we are and how we practice design. We hope that our transparency will inspire others to engage in critical discourse about equity in design as well as how these issues manifest in the built environment.

Ayers Saint Gross’s culture has always valued social, educational, and cultural engagement that aligns with social sustainability. We actively engage with the United Way of Central Maryland and Valley of the Sun United Way; our staff serve as mentors and board members for the ACE Mentor Program of America across the country; we finance scholarship opportunities at a number of institutions to support students in attaining the education that will advance them in the design professions; we staff a Careers in Design exploration program to inspire fifth graders at Beechfield Elementary School in West Baltimore; and this spring we are hosting our first Jim Wheeler Day of Service in honor of our firm’s former president.

We believe in an equitable community. Our firm has already invested a lot in supporting equity, diversity, and inclusion in our professions and within the communities where we live and work, but we have often followed our instincts rather than evaluating against benchmarks. This JUST Disclosure helps us make and track measurable commitments and is the next step in our commitment to social sustainability. We look forward to advancing our discussion about equity, diversity, and inclusion in quantitative ways in addition to the activities we already qualitatively discuss across our practice.

Making our JUST Disclosure also supports our clients and projects. Third-party certifications for high performance buildings, including the Living Building Challenge and LEED, recognize the importance of social equity. Our JUST Disclosure will support the Living Building Challenge Petal Certification of Semans-Griswold Environment Hall and allow every one of our LEED projects to access LEED’s Pilot Credit for Social Equity within the Project Team. We are encouraged that third-party rating systems are increasingly engaging in dialogue on social sustainability and are enthusiastic to be a part of that conversation.

Our JUST Disclosure helps us walk the walk when it comes to social equity and we hope our colleagues in other organizations will join us in advancing this dialogue.

Ayers Saint Gross at SEAHO 2019

February 25, 2019
Share

If you’re attending SEAHO 2019 in Jacksonville, Florida this week I hope you’ll visit Ayers Saint Gross at booth 319 and join us for our educational session on the importance of designing for both private and communal spaces in student housing.

From Facility to Facilitator: Community, Privacy, and Inclusivity in Shared Spaces
For many first-year students, the residence hall is their first home outside of the family home. The most successful student housing facilities build a strong community among residents, while providing opportunities for the individual to have privacy when needed. Outside-the-unit spaces like lounges and laundry rooms are critical to community-building, while student units, even shared doubles, can be configured to provide moments of seclusion. Bathrooms are unique in that they bridge these two goals. Some daily activities demand privacy, while others confer an opportunity to strengthen the social connections formed through communal living. This program will review case studies at Virginia Commonwealth University and other institutions to illustrate how thoughtfully designed outside-the-unit spaces and bathroom facilities in student housing can accommodate the individual’s need for privacy while building a sense of community and a culture of inclusion.

Presenters
Gavin Roark, Director of Residential Life & Housing,
Virginia Commonwealth University
Megan Becker, Ed.D., Associate Director of Residential Life, Virginia Commonwealth University
Eric Moss, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Cooper Melton, Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
SEAHO 2019
Thursday, February 28, 2019
10:15 – 11:15 AM
Session 3
City Terrace Room 8