The 2019 AIA Women’s Leadership Summit

November 5, 2019
Share

Equity, diversity, and inclusion are core values at Ayers Saint Gross and are vital to increasing the representation and advancement of women in architecture and design. This September, the AIA Women’s Leadership Summit was held in Minneapolis. Spanning three days and featuring dozens of workshops and speakers, more than 750 women architects and design professionals gathered at this important event, themed “Reframe. Rethink. Refresh.”

I have attended the past Women’s Leadership Summit programs with fellow colleague Elizabeth McLean, AIA; Seattle in 2015, Washington, DC in 2017 (I was fortunate to be on the Mid-Atlantic strategic planning committee) and this recent summit. Reflecting on this year (the largest attendance on record), it was interesting to see a diverse range of attendees in Minneapolis – in age, geographical representation, and many first-time attendees. For me, the summits provide both challenge and encouragement — replenishing my well year after year. The women pioneers around these issues in our industry come; Beverly Willis and Rosa Sheng, among others. And so do the local chapter committees, sole proprietors from rural practices, and the mid-level architect struggling with what’s next for her career. They each have an impactful story, a welcoming spirit, and a wave of commitment to our practice.

The summit was spent unpacking leadership styles, practicing active listening, and uncovering intentional impact areas. The benefits are not only personal but bring into focus the strengths needed to continue to support Ayers Saint Gross’s diverse clients and projects.

The metrics still show small growth for women as they progress through our profession and into leadership or more prominent design roles. The 2019 AIA Women’s Leadership Summit demonstrated a record number of women and firms committed to accelerating progress. It is this level of conversation that our profession deserves and requires to continue the hard work to bring about more equitable architecture. In addition to myself, Ayers Saint Gross was proudly represented by multiple attendees from across our offices. I am happy to share their thoughts and impressions.

Elizabeth McLean, AIA:

The AIA Women’s Leadership Summit strives to raise the profile of leadership in architecture, share and promote the design work of women, explore paths to leadership, and provide women the opportunity to learn from each other. This format crosses boundaries and allows for both strength and humility to shine. Our participation is important, with it we recognize individuals at different levels and support them to engage, learn, and extend the conversation when they each return to their offices and communities. The summit offered a space to share and grow; to reconnect.

This year’s gathering supported the conversation around moving forward and regrouping. I appreciated reframing the conversation. The public acknowledgement that every woman in architecture is a leader is powerful, and it provided the opportunity to be more inclusive and allow the numbers to increase the inspiration and potential for impact. It shifted focus beyond the individual and promoted empathy and generosity, acknowledging that leadership is empathetic and comes with accountability.

There is still a lack of women in leadership positions. We are urged and inspired to be on the forefront of confronting the issue and not only aware of it. The summit operated as a laboratory to test the potential for change across scales. There is an action-based emphasis on commitment and accountability. Considering formal and informal power, and large and small commitments, we challenged – What’s the stance, goal, commitment, and change? With this, there is meaningful purpose to gathering together.

Anya Grant, AIA:

As a first time attendee to the AIA Women’s Leadership Summit, I expected to be impressed by prominent women architects whose experiences paved the way and continue to clear a path for practicing architects like me. I was. What I didn’t expect was to also have the time and space to meaningfully engage with other women at various stages in the profession who are making their own mark as leaders. 

Through the medium of storytelling, we were guided through the personal accounts of women practicing in and reshaping the profession around the issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion. As we grapple with how to maintain a sense of inclusion in our profession, several presenters made a case for how it is not only relevant in our workplace, but also in engaging our clients. They raised the following question – whose voices are considered when design decisions are being made and how can we elevate the voices that are often unheard? One speaker, Malaz Elgemiabby described her efforts to meet community members on an individual basis when designing a community center. She not only learned about global needs that informed the design, but also points of neighborhood pride that were highlighted in murals. Pascale Sablan, in highlighting initiatives that promote diverse representation in architecture, described a community fellow position where a community member impacted by a design project is selected for a paid position to have a voice in regular design meetings. These accounts, among others, challenged us to think of the architect’s ability to engage and empower.

After days of stimulating conversations, we were invited by Pascale at the conclusion of her seminar, to turn to our neighbors and tell our own stories of leadership. This moment, where each woman spoke confidently of her ongoing work to shape our profession, highlighted the collective power of the hundreds of architects in attendance.

Nicole Ostrander, AIA:

Priya Parker, the keynote speaker, immediately set the tone of the summit as a supportive, collaborative, and empowering gathering of women, focused on storytelling. For the first several minutes of her session, we were encouraged to get up from our tables and step from our sphere of comfort to connect with new individuals by sharing a piece of own story with each other. Through this activity, Parker, author of The Art of Gathering:  How We Meet and Why it Matters was creating what she defines in her book as a transformational gathering. The AIA Women’s Leadership Summit was a created space in which attendees could open themselves to each other and forge connections. Parker provides excellent insight on how to give your gatherings purpose – whether a meeting, workshop, or dinner party – to create meaningful encounters.

Many of the sessions at the conference were focused on the topics of leadership, professional and personal development, and time management. With a range of women, all driven individuals at various points in their careers, there was a common narrative of navigating our own professional and personal responsibilities through shared experiences.

Teri Graham, AIA:

This was my first AIA Women’s Leadership Summit. It was powerful experience both in self-discovery and connection with other women with similar journey. We are not alone. The session “How To Set Your Career Path And Lead Authentically” presented by Jill Bergman, Katie Fricke, and Sandy Tkacz focused on self-discovery and connecting with others to advance in our careers. Emphasizing the importance of investing in yourself, the first step is to know thyself. Accomplished by growing your soft skills, assessing your skill gaps, and being resilient and proactive, you can be your own change maker. The next step discussed networking by both giving and receiving through finding an advocate and advocating. Career reflection points combined both know thyself and connecting through discussion on coaching, listening, taking ownership, understanding purpose, leading, and believing you are worth it. The big takeaway was we need to be a BRAT: Being Bold, Being Resourceful, Take Action, Have Tenacity.

Alice Brooks, AIA is an associate principal based out of the Baltimore office. Contact Alice.

The Value of Engagement

September 27, 2019
Share

This post is a collaboration between Amber Wendland and Corey Rothermel.

Engagement is at the core of Ayers Saint Gross’s mission and our planning practice. We strongly believe in the collective wisdom of a facilitated, inclusive planning and design process. In our rapidly changing world, communication, knowledge sharing, and connections are vital to generating consensus around shared visions. We work with varied and diverse groups of stakeholders to generate creative ideas that respect local culture, climate, and setting.

Our planning process involves overlapping activities that bring together the people and information needed to create a plan for the future. Effective implementation of planning visions is only possible through a carefully designed and executed process that engages stakeholders to reflect the mission and values of each institution, organization, or municipality.

Project success is more easily achieved through better knowledge, understanding, and buy-in. Engagement achieves all three of these things. Engagement not only allows us to be better designers by coalescing more input, but it is also an opportunity to generate excitement and harmony among stakeholders around a shared vision.

Engaging On Campus

In a higher education setting, in addition to the senior leadership that typically makes up a steering committee, broader public engagement is a way to bring students, faculty, technical staff, operational staff, and community members to the table. These stakeholders are the experts on how the campus is working and what is needed to best support student experience, student success, and operations.

Higher education clients also bring unique challenges; a significant one is finding the right time to engage stakeholders. Students, staff, and faculty have different schedules and are on campus at different times throughout the day. Identifying the best time (or times) to engage with stakeholders is the first hurdle.

It is critical to market the event through multiple avenues (email blasts, posters, web postings, adverts, etc.) and convey why it is important. Support from the client helps in this arena. They are critical in spreading the word, providing space to host an event or activity, and supplying incentives. Perhaps even more important, the client is the one that can best identify who should be in the room. This entails not only bringing in the right stakeholders to provide input, but also making sure that they are comfortable sharing their thoughts in a safe setting.

Stakeholders can tell when planners and designers are not genuinely interested in hearing their thoughts. At Ayers Saint Gross, we emphasize the value of bringing a broad and diverse set of stakeholders into our process and incorporating their valuable insight and input into our projects. Ultimately, this is the best way to produce dynamic projects that have wide-spread support, clear implementation, and create great experiences for all.

Ayers Saint Gross helped assist Tarrant County College (TCC) in creating a vision that would help to transform their traditional format libraries into Learning Commons to better meet the needs of today’s students and faculty. Building off our previous work with TCC that identified a college-wide need to increase pedagogical connectivity between learning inside and outside the classroom, we knew that the existing libraries were less than ideal for educators and students alike. Our team lead an engagement-heavy planning process for all five physical TCC campuses that included parallel in-person and online efforts for students, staff, and faculty.

Each group was asked a unique and comprehensive set of questions that collectively helped formulate the vision and scope for what the new Learning Commons could be. Responses highlighted the opportunities that existed to capitalize on the transformation of libraries into Learning Commons by incorporating spaces, programs, and resources that would help redefine the relationship between pedagogy, teaching, and the library space. Ayers Saint Gross then took this feedback to college leadership and used it to guide and facilitate the decision making that led to final designs.

At each student open house, we brought 40 pizzas anticipating that we would be well covered. Thanks to fantastic event marketing by the client, students showed up and participated en masse leading to the pizzas quickly disappearing. In all, we went through 200 pizzas over a 48-hour period.

Engaging in the Community

In urban planning, the most important stakeholders are community members. To produce an ethical, sustainable plan, it is vital that we begin by openly listening to the needs of the residents, business owners, elected officials, city government, and other stakeholders. Engagement must continue throughout the development of the plan to ensure the vision accurately depicts the desires of the community. This requires listening and a thoughtful exchange of knowledge; the community educates us on their needs and we educate them on components of the planning process. Engagement strategies include addressing individual questions in breakout sessions, polling, design stations, or boards where people can deliver comments and have conversations more intimately. This makes engagement more personal and is the kind of one-on-one interaction required to build rapport and consensus.

For the East Baltimore Revitalization Plan, the community had been the unfortunate recipient of decades of underinvestment, discriminatory practices, and neglect. There was an understandable skepticism of planners. The residents remembered decades of urban renewal when whole neighborhoods were razed and communities were torn apart. The team needed to develop trust to create a Master Plan that captured the community’s fundamental needs and served as a vision for them to champion moving forward.

When designing exercises, it is critical to make a strong effort to minimize implicit bias and design activities that accommodate variety of perspectives and abilities. This covers everything from the selection of images and wording of questions to the actual physical layout of exercises to enable stakeholders of differing backgrounds and experiences to participate. It is vital that everyone feel and be included.

Our carefully crafted engagement strategy was founded on these principles and we were able deliver a vision and plan for the community while building relationships, trust, and confidence within the community to carry the plan forward into implementation.

Transferring planning knowledge to community members should not be approached didactically, but instead as a two-way conversation to help inform and empower community residents. Speaking personally, during a final community meeting for the Southwest Neighborhood Plan, while reviewing final recommendations, I carefully walked one woman through a recommendation for increased zoning capacity, as it was a crucial move in order to be able to provide adequate affordable housing in the future. About 15 minutes later her friend arrived and had the same concern, I watched her explain to her friend exactly what I had walked her through. Not only allaying someone’s concerns, but giving them the tools to share with their fellow community members is incredibly rewarding and a great reminder of the real-life impacts of our work.

Ayers Saint Gross at SCUP 2019

July 11, 2019
Share

The SCUP 2019 Annual Conference is being held in Seattle this year, and we are pleased to have an abundance of good news to share in the Emerald City.

Ayers Saint Gross has won the SCUP Excellence Award in Landscape Architecture for General Design for the San Martin Drive Pedestrian Improvements at Johns Hopkins University. The project highlights a natural asset while improving the safety and well-being of students. The landscape design incorporates four major elements: defining a continuous pedestrian connection the length of the corridor, developing clear and safe crossings of the roadway, creatively resolving the need for pedestrian connections in an environmentally sensitive area, and establishing clear entry gates to the University. We are happy to announce the honor and proud of this project and our design team for their incredible and life-changing work.


A new year at SCUP also means a new Comparing Campuses poster. Since 1998, Ayers Saint Gross has annually published this poster featuring campus plans from leading institutions around the world. After a number of years focusing on specific themes, this year’s poster is a recall to our original style and features eleven new additions to our collection. Featuring a mix of large and small campuses and punctuated with sustainability facts, we’ve assembled this collection as a tool for institutional planners in the belief that understanding campus organization and data will lead to the creation of even better spaces in which to live, learn, and teach.

We look forward to seeing everyone at the conference. Come and visit us at booth 401.

Ayers Saint Gross at SCUP Southern 2018

October 23, 2018
Share

If you’re in Austin next week for SCUP Southern, I hope you’ll join me on Tuesday October 30 for our firm’s session on campus planning. Here are the details.

An Instigator and Path to Crafting a Campus Plan

As institutions continually evolve, students, staff, and faculty must thoughtfully utilize planning resources to strategically guide development towards an exceptional campus experience. This session will illustrate conditions that support the need for a campus master plan, what to incorporate into the effort, and how to adopt a planning continuum on campus. Come learn how to develop and refine skills to critically analyze past and current planning efforts to identify potential process adjustments leading to increased planning impact on your campus. Learning outcomes include:

  1. Identify urban planning and campus design factors that indicate the need for a master plan at your institution.
  2. Determine what elements (examples: new development, mobility and safety, sustainability, wellness, historic preservation, wayfinding, etc.) are most critical to your master planning efforts.
  3. Craft an outline that identifies the “who” and “what” necessary for a successful master planning process.
  4. Define a planning continuum that uses the campus master plan going forward for enduring improvement on your campus.

Presenters
David C. Brown, Planner, Texas A&M University-College Station
Dana Craig Dixon, Senior Associate, Ayers Saint Gross
Corey Rothermel, Associate, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Tuesday October 30, 2018
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM

Credits
AIA LU 1.0 unit (SCUPS18C21)
AICP CM 1.0 unit

Ayers Saint Gross at TCUF 2018

September 13, 2018
Share

If you’re in San Antonio next week, I hope you’ll join the Ayers Saint Gross team at one of our three TCUF sessions, or visit our display in the Architectural Showcase. Here’s where we’ll be.

A New Era of Sustainability Planning: From Vision to Implementation
Texas A&M’s 2018 Sustainability Master Plan integrates social equity objectives with environmental and economic efforts while balancing the need for long-term vision with action and accountability. Through nine themes that address the physical environment, social sustainability, waste management, and institutional efforts, sustainability initiatives at Texas A&M have been transformed from an environment-heavy focus to an approach that places equal emphasis on all three elements of sustainability’s triple bottom line.

Concurrent to developing the university’s Sustainability Master Plan, Texas A&M’s Department of Residence Life sought ways to evaluate its contribution to institution-wide sustainability efforts and prioritize future endeavors. The Residence Life Sustainability Master Plan seeks to advance the department’s capacity to operate sustainable facilities, support sustainable life skills education, and leverage competitive advantage in the local student housing market.

Presenters
Chareny Rydl, Director of Residence Life, Texas A&M University
Lara Hendrickson, Sustainability Operations Coordinator, Texas A&M University
Allison Wilson, Sustainability Director, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Friday September 21, 2018
Republic C (4th Floor)
1:00PM – 2:00PM


An Instigator and Path to Crafting a Campus Plan
Campus master plans, both aspirational in vision and realistic in implementation, seek to guide the long-term physical development of institutions in alignment with their vision, mission and goals. The session will evaluate and illustrate conditions supporting the need for a campus master plan, what to incorporate into the effort and how to adopt a continuum of planning on campus.

Texas A&M University’s 2017 Campus Master Plan will serve as a case study, guiding attendees through the process of determining when a plan is needed, where to focus your efforts, what elements might be included, who to engage in the process, how the proposed transformations have impacted the campus experience and why to outline future supporting planning efforts for continuous improvement.

Attendees will develop and refine skills to critically analyze past and current planning efforts to identify potential process adjustments leading to increased planning impacts on your campus.

Presenters
Lilia Y. Gonzales, University Architect, Texas A&M University
Dana Dixon, Senior Associate, Ayers Saint Gross
Corey Rothermel, Associate, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Friday September 21, 2018
2:10PM – 3:10 PM
Republic B (4th Floor)


Enterprise Planning: A Case for Moving Beyond a Traditional Master Plan
Differing from a traditional master plan which focuses solely on the built environment, enterprise planning touches all areas of an institution to guide strategic direction. The outcome is a shared vision which becomes the framework for policies, programs, and physical space.

Through a highly collaborative process involving hundreds of Tarrant County College stakeholders, a series of charrettes acted as the primary tool for discovery, analysis, and dialogue. The activities sought to create a collective understanding of key concepts, establish big-picture priorities, and discuss stakeholder ideas for the near term and long term. These workshops created a venue to discover and analyze challenges, craft potential solutions, and define the future, all in tandem.

The outcome was the establishment of three overarching goals and a set of eight principles that together serve as the pillars of the college’s vision and guide all areas of the institution.

Presenters
Nina Petty, Vice Chancellor for Real Estate & Facilities, Tarrant County College
Doug Lowe, President, Facility Programming and Consulting
Jack Black, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Corey Rothermel, Associate, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Saturday September 22, 2018
11:15 AM – 12:15PM
Crockett C/D

2018 Comparing Campuses: Student Housing

July 10, 2018
Share

2018 marks the 20th edition of our firm’s Comparing Campuses poster. Since 1998, we have explored hundreds of campus plans from leading institutions around the world. We assemble this collection as a tool for institutional planners because we believe that understanding campus organization and data will lead to the creation of even better spaces in which we live, learn, and teach. We understand the importance of research, and believe that sharing our research contributes to creating better campuses.

Last year, we turned to the past, exploring historic campus master plans and how they helped shape their respective campuses today.

This year, we’re going home – or more precisely, to the on-campus places that students call home.

Housing plays a central role in students’ lives. The residential experience can be a competitive amenity that contributes to a university’s brand. Well-designed spaces and varied typologies should meet the needs of students as they change and grow throughout their college experiences.

Our 2018 poster compares campus-owned housing typology, density, and distribution across 10 institutions. Each map highlights housing facilities color coded by the predominant unit type, overlaid with a series of circles scaled to represent the number of beds in each building. We hope you enjoy exploring how these different institutions have created places that students can call home.

If you won’t be at SCUP, please email us at comparingcampuses@asg-architects.com and we’ll be happy to send you a copy. Additionally, the entire Comparing Campuses collection is available on our website. Visit us there, or at booth 109 at SCUP 2018 to claim your copy. We’ll see you in Nashville, and look forward to discussing the many ways to help students feel at home on campus.

Ayers Saint Gross at 2018 National Planning Conference

April 17, 2018
Share

If you’re in New Orleans for the APA’s 2018 National Planning Conference later this week, I hope you’ll join me on Saturday April 21 for an educational program on creating a master plan for one of the most challenged neighborhoods in Baltimore. Our approach uses robust engagement founded on empowering residents to provide comprehensive community input and involving public and private stakeholders across a city.

Restoring People While Rebuilding Properties

For decades, the Broadway East neighborhood has struggled with some of the highest vacancy and poverty rates in Baltimore. Economic disinvestment, housing abandonment, and crime have left the community destitute. While many residents have fled over the past few decades, a number of lifelong citizens and institutions remain, anchoring the neighborhood with hope and memories of a past vibrant village.

In response to the spring 2015 unrest following the death of Freddie Gray, Reverend Donte Hickman, a neighborhood leader, met with Ayers Saint Gross. The need for a clear, collective vision and master plan for the future was evident. It was essential that this vision be founded on community input. The public outreach was a comprehensive, three-step process, focused on empowering residents by teaching them about planning practices, terminology, and process. While the plan is founded on community input, the overall engagement extends across the city, through both the public and private sectors, building consensus, support, and resources for future development. With corporate partners, city leaders, and community members on board, development is beginning to take off.

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Create a robust, community-centered engagement process that empowers residents of a disenfranchised neighborhood by teaching them about planning practices, terminology, and process;
  • Engage a community that has typically been underserved, and has recently been under national scrutiny as the center of civil unrest; and
  • Understand the value of consensus building from not only a community engagement perspective, but also among city agencies and private investors.

Presenters
Adam Gross, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross
Rev. Dr. Donte L. Hickman, Pastor, Southern Baptist Church
Amber Wendland, Associate, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Saturday, April 21, 2018
1:00 PM – 2:15 PM
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center
900 Convention Center Boulevard
New Orleans, LA 70130

Ayers Saint Gross at CCFM 2018

April 5, 2018
Share

If you’re attending the Conference for Catholic Facilities Management in Austin next week, you can catch Ayers Saint Gross presenting on our transformational planning project for the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

Creating a New Vision for Catholic Schools in Baltimore
From the 1880s to the mid-20th century, Catholic education flourished in the United States with the peak of Catholic school construction in the mid-1960s. Since then, deferred maintenance costs, increased competition, changes in the labor market, and shifting demographics have placed increased pressure on the viability of many schools. In Baltimore, schools operated well below capacity, and were often consolidated or forced to close. The Archdiocese of Baltimore sought to stem this decline, and in 2015 began a process of addressing the existing conditions at 22 schools throughout the diocese.

Through a series of community and school meetings, workshops, and strategy sessions, the Archdiocese worked with a team of consultants to analyze demographic, facility, enrollment, and financial data to formulate a strategy for reinvestment. That plan, along with a rebranding and media campaign, has injected new life into the school system, spurring capital investment and enrollment growth.

Members of the Archdiocese and planning team will share the process, tools, and outcomes from this transformational planning project and will share how the framework can be used for institutions of all sizes.

Presenters

Nolan McCoy, Director of Facilities Management, Archdiocese of Baltimore
Joel Fidler, Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross

Details
Conference for Catholic Facilities Management
Tuesday, April 10, 2018
Session 1: 10:30 AM until 11:30 AM
Session 2: 1:30 PM until 2:30 PM

2017 Comparing Historic Campus Plans

July 7, 2017
Comparing Campusus SCUP 2017
Share

Continuing the tradition begun in 1998, Ayers Saint Gross has published a new Comparing Campuses poster for 2017. Over the years, we have explored hundreds of campus plans from leading institutions around the world. We assemble this collection as a tool for institutional planners in the belief that understanding campus organization and data will lead to the creation of even better spaces in which to live, learn, and teach. We understand the importance of research, and believe that sharing our research contributes to creating better campuses.

In 2016, our Comparing Campuses poster explored Innovation Districts, communities that align academia, government, and the private sector. These mixed-use districts offer an exciting glimpse into the future of science, business, and urbanism.

For 2017, we’re turning our attention to the past, and specifically to the ways that universities grow and change. This year’s Comparing Campuses poster highlights historic campus master plans and their relationships to their respective campuses today.

The history of an institution makes for fascinating study, and can inform future planning. In some cases, all the originally planned buildings are still part of campus. In others, none of the original buildings have survived the march of time (or were never built at all). We hope you enjoy seeing how the 11 campuses featured on the 2017 poster evolved over years, decades, and even centuries.

If you won’t be at SCUP, please email us at comparingcampuses@asg-architects.com and we’ll be happy to send you a copy. Additionally, for almost 20 years, Ayers Saint Gross has gathered data on the physical characteristics of campuses for our Comparing Campuses posters. The collection now exceeds 200 campuses, and is available on our website. Visit us there, or at booth 403 at SCUP 2017 to claim your copy. We hope to see you in Washington, and look forward to discussing the past, present, and future of campus planning.

Transforming Sustainability at Texas A&M

March 24, 2017
Share

When Texas A&M decided to update its 2004 campus master plan with a team of Ayers Saint Gross planners, six integrated focus elements guided the work:

  • Campus Development
  • Mobility and Safety
  • Sustainability and Wellness
  • Campus Guidelines
  • Heritage Conservation
  • Wayfinding and Signage

My role on the team was most closely aligned with Sustainability and Wellness, and our firm’s work in this area is the subject of a session I’ll be co-presenting with Texas A&M’s University Architect, Lilia Gonzales, and Director of Sustainability, Kelly Wellman at the Smart and Sustainable Campuses Conference on March 27. I’m excited about digging into the integrated approach that Texas A&M has taken in planning its campus.

A selection of Texas A&M’s planning work between 2004 and the 2017 Campus Master Plan includes:

  • Sustainability Master Plan
  • Bicycle District Strategic Plan
  • Energy Action Plan
  • Utility and Energy Master Plan
  • Stormwater Management Program
  • District Plans to Direct Physical Development
  • Biennial Sustainability Progress Reports
  • AASHE STARS Report

Each of these elements informed the vision for a sustainable campus that is integrated throughout the 2017 Campus Master Plan to facilitate transformation across the campus community. Coordinating these efforts under a single master plan will clarify Texas A&M’s visions of a sustainable campus and support the transformative ideas the institution has for its campus.

Among other subjects, the Sustainability and Wellness portion of the 2017 Campus Mater Plan includes initiatives about:

  • Building on the success of the recent upgrades to the campus central heat and power plant to continue reductions in energy demand and GHG emissions
  • Managing stormwater with green infrastructure
  • Improving pedestrian mobility across the university’s large campus footprint
  • Developing greater connectivity for the bicycle network both on and off campus
  • Continuing the transition from interior surface lots to perimeter parking garages
  • Advancing the institution’s stated objective of designing LEED Silver equivalent buildings to a more A&M-specific set of high-performance design requirements
  • Progressing the deployment of universal recycling containers on campus
  • Celebrating Texas A&M’s historic legacy while furthering diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts
  • Increasing opportunities for education, outreach, and engagement

Hope to see you at Smart and Sustainable!

Top 10 Blog Posts of 2016

December 16, 2016
Share

It’s been an eventful year for Ayers Saint Gross. As we turn the calendar page, here’s a look at our most popular blog posts of 2016. We’re proud of what we accomplished with our clients, and are excited about what’s to come in 2017.

1. Luanne Greene is Ayers Saint Gross’ New President. Having distinguished herself as head of our Planning studio and as an acknowledged industry leader, Luanne rose to become the President of Ayers Saint Gross. She is the first woman to lead the firm in its 100-year history.

2. Anne Hicks Harney Elevated to AIA College of Fellows. Our Sustainability Director is now one of four FAIAs at Ayers Saint Gross, alongside Glenn Birx, Luanne Greene, and Adam Gross. Anne was also named a LEED Fellow this year.

3. Placemaking for People: How Stormwater Management Can Be a Design Asset. The unglamorous necessity of stormwater management can be a starting point for truly great design in landscape architecture.

4. Place Matters: Cortex Innovation Community Wins SCUP Award. Recognition from the Society of College and University Planning was a huge honor. Innovation Districts like Cortex provide a new paradigm for research, business, and job creation.

5. National Aquarium Waterfront Campus Plan Wins AIA Maryland Award. The National Aquarium is a world-renowned conservation organization, and we are excited to be a part of the revitalization of its campus.

6. 2016 Comparing Campuses Innovation Districts. We did a deep dive on Innovation Districts in our 18th annual Comparing Campuses poster. (We also have an online archive of all the Comparing Campuses posters.)

7. A Brief History of the Ayers Saint Gross ACUHO-I Housing Book. We’ve been creating these tiny but informative books since 2005 for the annual ACUHO-I conference. We’ll see you in Providence in June with the 2017 edition.

8. Telling a Story with Data. Lisa Keith, head of our Space Analytics studio, wowed the KA Connect Conference with her data visualization expertise.

9. Ayers Saint Gross Reaches $1B in LEED Construction. With the LEED Silver certification of Georgetown University’s Ryan and Isaac Halls, our firm crossed the billion-dollar mark in LEED certified construction. To celebrate, we created an infographic that illustrates exactly what $1,000,000,000 in LEED construction looks like.

10. Going Green, Staying Green: How to Create and Enduring, Sustainable Landscape. Align your sustainability goals with available resources, and consider the life cycle costs of your choices.

The Endless Park: PARK(ing) Day 2016

September 21, 2016
Share

PARK(ing) Day got its start in 2005, and has since become a global celebration of public space in urban contexts. As a firm, Ayers Saint Gross celebrates sustainability and the importance of green spaces as a necessary part of good urban design. This year the DC office was thrilled to tackle a parking space in NoMa and turn it into an “endless park.”

The goal was to get passersby from the NoMa community to disrupt their daily routines and immerse themselves in an unexpected retreat while learning about urban sustainability practices.

We created our pop-up park out of salvaged wooden pallets from a local construction site, fresh layers of sod, and (most importantly) a series of mirrors. Mirrors have long been a go-to move for making interior spaces seem larger; we figured they could do the same thing for an outdoor space. Thus our mirrors faced each other, creating the illusion of an infinite, endless park.

img_7795

We also had a series of posters informing park-goers about urban sustainability. All together it made for a relaxing and informative spot.

Of course, the best urban design is not delivered from on high; it is a collaboration between the designers and the community. With that in mind, we wanted to include an interactive element in our park. We asked pedestrians to contribute by writing thoughts, activities, and feelings about parks and sustainability on tags. The tags became petals on flower-like stakes that were laid out on the park’s grass, creating a “endless” field of wildflowers in the mirrored reflection. As we grew our field of flowers throughout the day, it became a beautiful metaphor for the endless benefits of sustainability.

parking-day-flower

Photo courtesy of Laetitia Brock

To support sustainability once more at the conclusion of the day, our team returned the wood pallets to the construction site and planted the sod nearby in NoMa.

The mission of PARK(ing) Day is to call attention to the need for more urban open space, to generate debate around how public space is created and allocated, and to improve the quality of urban human habitat. While our “endless park” lasted only a day, creativity and a thoughtful approach to urban space are ever-present parts of our firm’s philosophy.

img_7811